#AbledsAreWeird offers a brilliant taste of the everyday crap people with disabilities deal with.

People without disabilities may not realize how much more difficult they make life for those with them. Folks who deal with physical or mental disabilities already face challenges in a world designed for abled people. But lack of access and accommodations are not the only difficulties they have to take on. Far too often, people with disabilities also have to battle ignorance and stigma from their fellow humans. People with disabilities have taken to Twitter to share their personal accounts of able-bodied and able-minded people’s bizarre comments and behaviors toward them. Twitter user Imani Barbarin created the hashtag #AbledsAreWeird to accompany the stories—a sarcastic jab at those among us who are oblivious to the lives of a good portion of …

This explanation of mens emotional needs will encourage you to compliment the guys in your life more often.

Over the past several decades, there has been a massive movement – rightfully so – to be consciously encouraging to girls and women. They’ve been told they can do anything and be anything and taught to get an education and take care of themselves, all of which is wonderful and necessary. While boys and men may not need to be reminded as often to peruse their dreams, they need to be told that their emotional needs are valid. The belief that boys and men need to be stoic and stay guarded in order to be a “real man” helps create many of the emotional issues they face. via Tumblr via Tumblr via Tumblr This conditioning is damaging, and one Tumblr …

In rural Kenya, women’s healthcare can be hard to access. This program is changing that.

Susan, a 25-year-old who lives in rural West Pokot, Kenya, has a daily routine. All photos via Pfizer. She wakes up at 6am every day to get water from the river. She prepares breakfast for her family. She gets her five children ready for school. Then she sets off for work, caring for her animals and plowing the earth on her farm. On her one day off a week, she takes her family to church. She loves spending time with her family and community. Susan, and women like her, have always played an important role in the local culture. However, they’ve often had challenges accessing information and resources about their health, including the importance of healthy timing and spacing of …

She asked men how they stand up to misogyny and predatory behavior. The answers are awesome.

Men are sharing examples of how they step up and step in when they see problematic behaviors in their peers, and people are here for it. Twitter user “feminist next door” posed an inquiry to her followers, asking “good guys” to share times they saw misogyny or predatory behavior and did something about it. “What did you say,” she asked. “What are your suggestions for the other other men in this situation?” She added a perfectly fitting hashtag: #NotCoolMan. Good guys: tell me about a time you saw misogyny or predatory behavior in action and spoke up. What did you say? What are your suggestions for other men in this situation? #NotCoolMan — feminist next door (@emrazz) March 3, 2019 …

Mansplaining: This awesome comic breaks down the definition and shares examples.

If you’re living in 2018, you’ve probably encountered mansplaining — the word or, unfortunately, the real thing. What is mansplaining? Are you doing it? And what do you do when you find yourself up against a mansplainer? Luckily, the good folks over at The Nib are here with handy answers to all three — in delightful comic form. “Mansplaining, Explained”: “The last guy I dated was a real mansplainer.” “Mansplaining, Explained”: “‘Mansplainer.’ I never get that word.” “Mansplaining, Explained”: “Luckily, I’ve been on enough dates to prepare for this situation.” “Mansplaining, Explained”: “It’s a word that describes a pattern of behavior in our culture.” Mansplaining is a word that describes a pattern in our society of overlooking and dismissing women’s …

Howand whyan ailing U.S. veteran is helping these Venezuelan refugees start a new life.

Luis and Jude Vivas, with their son, Luis Jr. Editor’s note: If you want to help the Vivas family, you can contribute directly to their GoFundMe campaign here. The campaign has been verified by the GoFundMe team, with 100% of the proceeds going toward immediate food, medical and housing needs for the family. When I connect with Jude and Luis Vivas, the couple is resting inside a tiny motel room in  Cúcuta, Colombia. The width of the room barely holds a small, twin sized bed that is covered in the six backpacks they carried across the Venezuelan border with their young son, Luis Jr. “We are very tired,” Jude says, translating the words of her husband into English. “Tired of …