Ninja Is Leaving Twitch. What’s Next?

Happy Friday, and welcome to Replay, WIRED's videogame news roundup. Some big shakeups in the streaming world this week, and Fortnite continues to pull out all the stops to stay on top. Let's get caught up on the biggest gaming headlines, starting now. Ninja Is Leaving Twitch for Mixier Pastures Ninja is arguably the most popular streamer ever, and he's no longer on Twitch. As reported by Polygon, Ninja, aka Tyler Blevins, announced on Thursday that he's leaving Twitch.tv for Mixer, exclusively broadcasting on the comparatively smaller, more niche service. Niche is a relative term here, though; while Twitch.tv is a part of Amazon's massive internet monopoly, Mixer is owned by Microsoft, which is investing in the platform in the …

Nintendo’s Reportedly Fixing Those Broken Joy-Cons for Free

Greetings, friends. Welcome to Replay, WIRED's look at the week in gaming news. What's happened since the last time we checked in? Well, we have some new details on Google Stadia's approach to the cloud, a look at Nintendo's evolving customer service procedures, and a very good game recommendation. Let's get going. Google Isn't Worried About All Your Games Being in the Cloud, But You Probably Should Be At its core, Google Stadia solves a big problem: the total and utter lack of a solid streaming videogame service. But, as an all-cloud gaming system, using Stadia means that your games are at the mercy of the cloud itself. If the servers go offline, or get knocked out, or if Stadia …

Replay: Welp, We Might Be Getting a Final Fantasy XIV TV Show

Welcome to Replay, where you can catch up on a week's worth of videogame news in just a couple of minutes. This week, Sony is looking to make a Final Fantasy XIV show, and also, uh, there's Budweiser-related news? It's a weird one; strap in. Sony's Making Use of Their TV Division to Make a … Final Fantasy XIV Show? As we reported recently, Sony has opened up a wide-ranging TV division to develop, produce, and distribute television adaptations of their videogame properties and, presumably, the properties of their partners. Their first choice, though, is an odd one. As PC Gamer reports, Sony's working on a live-action television show about the massively multiplayer online role-playing game, Final Fantasy XIV. The …

Here’s Everything Nintendo Didand Didn’tAnnounce at E3

Greetings, and welcome back to WIRED's ongoing E3 coverage! What have you missed since yesterday? A lot, actually. The bulk of the news came from Nintendo's presentation, so we'll start there, but there's plenty more to get through. Here are the big stories—and the big absences—from the last 24 hours at gaming's biggest confab. Nintendo's Sequel to The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild Looks Spooky Easily the biggest news to come out of E3 yesterday was Nintendo's announcement that the company is already working on a sequel to The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. What's intriguing about the teaser Nintendo released at the show is the huge tonal shift from the previous game. It's Zelda and …

This Senator Wants to Ban Videogame Loot Boxes Aimed at Kids

Greetings, and welcome to a decidedly not lighthearted edition of Replay, WIRED's videogame news roundup. This week we have loot-box legislation, labor walkouts, and the return of Gearbox CEO Randy Pitchford. Let's get started. US Senator Introduces Bill to Ban Loot Boxes and 'Pay-to-Win' Mechanics in Games US Senator Josh Hawley, a Republican from Missouri, announced plans this week to introduce a bill titled "The Protecting Children from Abusive Games Act." The legislation, according to press materials provided by Hawley's camp, will make it illegal for games "played by minors" to include loot boxes or pay-to-win microtransactions. Precisely how a bill would accomplish this is less clear, as the very concepts of "pay-to-win" and even microtransactions are both a bit …