The big picture: America as seen by Robert Frank

Geoff Dyer on the influential American photographer who died last Monday aged 94 Its a common urge to want to go back in time and see or hear a once revolutionary, now iconic work of art as it looked or sounded before it was assimilated into the tradition it appeared to assault. In the case of The Americans by Robert Frank (who died last week, aged 94) this is surprisingly simple. All you have to do is look at the pictures. Even now, more than 60 years later, many of the pictures in the most influential photography book of the postwar period remain hard to fathom. Several of them were shot through windows, but prior ideas of framing and focus …

Through Our Eyes pictures taken by young migrants in Greece

Teenage asylum seekers document daily life in a camp on Samos Island This collection of photographs taken by teenage asylum seekers in Samos offers an intimate and powerful portrait of the hardship they face at the islands refugee camp, which was built for 650 people but is home to more than 4,000. The camp is one of five registration centres, or hotspots, for asylum seekers on the Greek islands in the Aegean Sea. Original Article : HERE ;

Mark Mawstons best photograph: Yoko Ono’s electrifying power

She came on stage with a black silk bag over her head and walked straight into the mic stand. It didnt ruin anything though. The crowd were in raptures I took this shot of Yoko Ono 14 years ago, in 2005 at bagism a practice she and Lennon engaged in as a way to deindividualise speakers and emphasise their message by wearing a nondescript bag over their heads. So she came out with this black silk bag obscuring her vision, and walked straight into the mic stand. It didnt ruin anything though. The crowd were in raptures. In a split second when I managed to take my eyes off her, I realised that Sean Lennon, her and Johns son, was …

30 Hilariously Unsuccessful Travel Photos

We celebrate amazing travel photography and rightly so, but what about the times when it all goes wrong? Those hilarious occasions when people have traveled across the world and completely failed to share its beauty in a photograph, times when they would’ve found more culture in their local supermarket than that blurry pic of the pyramids. This list of disappointing travel photos is funny for its self-awareness; these people understand the irony of traveling thousands of miles to see something that just happens to be cloaked in fog or undergoing repairs. #2 Traveled Thousands Of Miles To See The Big Ben #3 Not Mount Rushmore, But I Woke Up At 3am And Hiked Up Machu Picchu To Be There At …

5 Queer People on How They Found Their Chosen Families

It's a fairly common tale in the LGBTQ+ community: Queer people move away from home and build new families of their own. They go to cities, find friends and partners, and form a network. Since many queer individuals are rejected (or just simply tolerated) by their families of origin, this new support network is a place where they can shine and be their authentic selves. Anyone who has ever seen an episode of Pose knows this. Yet, with the spread of social media, messages boards, and apps, the ways in which LGBTQ+ folks find each other has changed dramatically. Some still find their chosen family IRL, but others do it by popping up in someone's DMs. To mark the conclusion …

The private Polaroids of a celebrated cinematographer

Robby Mller, who shot for Wim Wenders, Jim Jarmusch and more, was never without a camera The Polaroids were taken during rare moments of respite from work. On weekends, when he wasnt completely immersed in his day job, Robby Mller would pull out a SX-70, a 600, a Spectra, or whatever model of The day job, for Mller, was as director of photography on some of the most strikingly composed films of the late 20th century. His closest working relationship was with Wim Wenders; he shot 12 of the German directors features including Alice in the Cities, The American Friend and Paris, Texas. He also worked with Jim Jarmusch on Down By Law, Mystery Train and Dead Man, and Lars …

For The Last 10 Years, Ive Been Traveling To Inaccessible Corners Of The World And Photographing Indigenous People (30 Pics)

Alexander Khimushin. I am a traveling photographer born and raised in Sakha (Yakutia) – the coldest region of the world and one of the most isolated regions of Siberia. 10 years ago, I packed a backpack and set out on a journey that continues to this day, traveling alone to the most remote and inaccessible corners of the world. Visiting Indigenous People and learning about their cultures and traditional ways of living has become the most inspiring experience of my life. The last several years I dedicated to The World In Faces photo project that showcases the incredible diversity of our multicultural world through photo portraits and personal stories of Indigenous People. I made it my mission to tell the …

Home, sweet home: an emigrant’s view of Brexit photo essay

The British photographer Ed Alcock took French citizenship in 2018. He examines the UKs decision to leave the EU from a unique perspective Five dates anchor Paris-based photographer Ed Alcocks Home, Sweet Home: 1 January 1973, when Britain joined the EU; 11 April 1974, when he was born in Norwich; April 2000, when he moved to France; 23 June 2016, when the UK voted for Brexit; and 24 June 2018, when he became French. The cover of the New European, a newspaper founded in the weeks after the vote on Alcocks British passport (left) and a duplicate image with the words European Union removed I couldnt vote myself, said the photographer, who moved to France in 2000. But like all …

After People Claimed That This Smiling Man Photo From 1901 Was Fake, Tumblr User Explained That Rural Chinese People Didnt Know How To Pose

One thing that comes to mind when thinking about early photography is probably the lack of smiles. Today we instinctively put a big grin on our faces when someone with the camera approaches, however it was rather uncommon in the early 1800’s. So it’s probably not that surprising that when a photo of a Chinese man with a big toothy grin, which was taken in the early 1900’s, has surfaced people began doubting its authenticity. The American Museum of Natural History confirmed, that the photo titled “Eating rice, China” and taken between 1901-1904 is authentic The photo was taken during Jacob H. Schiff Chinese expedition when a young German scholar Berthold Laufer was sent to China to investigate the foreign …

To Be A Man: My Portrait Series Challenging The Concept of Toxic Masculinity

Toxic masculinity, a variation of masculinity, refers to the socially-constructed attitudes that describe the masculine gender role as violent, unemotional, sexually aggressive, and so forth. It restricts the kinds of emotions and characteristics that are socially acceptable for boys and men to express. Toxic masculinity is a variation of masculinity that has become the standard upon which the “real man” is defined but also by which ones masculinity can be challenged (The Good Men Project). This topic is no more relevant today than it has been in the past, the only difference is that now it is being discussed more openly. My intent with this photo series is not to create anti-male sentiments or attack masculinity but, show that it’s …