In Season 3, Stranger Things Rediscovers Its Groove

For all the talk about New Coke being a "plot point" in the third season of Stranger Things, rest easy: The infamous 1985 reformulation doesn't prove toxic to creatures from the Upside Down, or anything else remotely pivotal to the story. It does, however, provide the new installment's most self-aware moment. Late in the season, during a rare moment of no one's life being in immediate peril, Lucas (Caleb McLaughlin) cracks a can of the stuff, much to the gang's disgust. "How do you even drink that?" Mike (Finn Wolfhard) asks. "Because it's delicious," Lucas responds. "It's like Carpenter's The Thing. The original is a classic, no question about it. But the remake?"—and here he takes a comically loud gulp …

When Black Horror Consumes Us

Black horror is having a moment. All of a sudden the genre feels alive, feral, infinite. How delicious it tastes, too. Like Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man biting into that ambrosial yam, savoring something like self-release, the genre has gone sweet and hot, enriched as anything we’ve witnessed, a divinely wicked nectar, a sustenance of arrant want. But even with all this chatter about black horror’s Hollywood renaissance, and how Hitchcock heir apparent Jordan Peele has masterminded a movement toward the macabre—with Get Out, Us, The Twilight Zone, and upcoming projects that include a Candyman remake—one point gets lost: Donald Glover got here first. When I consider What Black Horror Means Today, with the thick of the present around me and …