This Is Pleasure by Mary Gaitskill review pitch perfect response to #MeToo

The American writers extraordinary novella tells the story of one mans fall from grace with real nerve Ostensibly, it seems quite shameless of Serpents Tail to have put Mary Gaitskills This Is Pleasure between hard covers. Her novella runs to a mere 84 tiny pages, each one printed in a typeface so large, the middle-aged will not even need to put on their glasses to read it; the story has, moreover, already Shitty Media Men (a list of allegations about various individuals in American publishing) that circulated on the internet in 2017. The tale is told, in alternate chapters, by two old friends, Margot and Quin. Both are married, middle-aged and work in publishing: Margot, who is American, is best …

Bernardine Evaristo doubles lifetime sales in five days after joint Booker win

Almost 6,000 copies of Girl, Woman, Other sold in the week after Evaristos win alongside Margaret Atwood Bernadine Evaristos The Testaments by Margaret Atwood also flying off bookshop shelves. New sales figures from Nielsen BookScan show that, in the five days following its win last Monday, Girl, Woman, Other sold 5,980 copies, a stratospheric 1,340% boost in sales week on week. In its previous five months on sale, the polyphonic novel, mostly narrated by black women, had sold 4,391 copies. This puts Evaristo in seventh place in this weeks hardback fiction chart, behind Atwoods already-bestselling follow-up to announced last week that the panel of five judges had been unable to settle on a winner for the 50,000 prize, and instead …

Paraic ODonnell on Wicklow: ‘There are 70 to 80 Agas per square mile’

The novelist reflects a bookish childhood, growing up in the Arthurian dreamscapes of the Wicklow mountains None of my fiction is set in the place where I grew up, at least not recognisably. My first novel was set in a mythologised England, my next in Victorian London. I used to wonder about this. Had my birthplace failed to make a sufficient impression? The Ireland of the 1980s, in the general view, was a bleak and rain-scoured theocracy whose writers were either plunged into alcoholism or ejected into exile, forever embittered but not, at least, short of good material. But I hardly felt oppressed at all, growing up. I didnt even mind the rain, particularly. My parents were moderately religious, but …

Kamila Shamsies book award withdrawn over her part in Israel boycott

Nelly Sachs prize was given to Shamsie this month, but its German jury has reversed decision because of the novelists pro-Palestinian activism Kamila Shamsie has said that it is a matter of outrage that the Israel boycott campaign should be held up as something shameful after a German jury reversed its decision to award her the 15,000 (13,000) Nelly Sachs prize over her support for the DivestmentSanctions (BDS) movement against Israel. The eight-member jury had decided on 6 September to make the British-Pakistani author their latest winner, citing writing that builds bridges between societies. But when they learned of passed a motion labelling the BDS movement as antisemitic, calling it reminiscent of the most terrible chapter in German history. The …

Top 10 books about fake news

Mendacious propaganda has a long history, in fiction from George Orwell to Philip Roth and real-life reports by authors including Roald Dahl We all lie. But some of us are better at it than others. Then there are people who are so good at lying that they are paid to change the minds of millions, using techniques few of us will ever understand. It is often said that we live in an age of fake news, but this has been going on for years, and so have attempts to describe, analyse and anticipate its impact on our political lives. Books about fake news have an unsettling and dystopian undertone, and they force us to question the headlines. At the same …

Ta Obreht: In America, we make progress, then revert in horrific ways’

At 25, she won the Orange prize with her first novel, The Tigers Wife. In her long awaited follow-up, she tackles the history of the American west How do you disrupt the mythology of the American west, with its campfires and cowboys, and its spirit of masculine self-reliance? If youre Ta Obreht, you add creatures and people who belong to the history but not to the myth. You add, say, camels.Inland, the long-awaited follow-up to her 2011 Orange prize-winning debut to the podcast Hi Jolly. His story allowed Obreht to explore the ironies of the eras shifting global power dynamics, in which a man who had lived under the heel of the Ottoman empire finds himself, quite by accident, serving …

JD Salinger estate finally agrees to ebook editions

Authors son explains that wish for accessibility has persuaded trustees to look past his fathers dislike of digital media After years of refusing to allow publishers to digitise his works, the estate of JD Salinger has announced that the authors famously small body of work will be published as ebooks for the first time. Salingers son Matt said that the author had always valued accessibility, but preferred the experience of reading a physical book. The Catcher in the Rye author, who died in 2010 at the age of 91, also hated the internet; Matt And in 2009, Fahrenheit 451 author Ray Bradbury told the New York Times: They wanted to put a book of mine on Yahoo! You know what …

Abortion, sex and family secrets: Annie Ernaux, France’s great truth teller

Ernauxs meticulously observed chronicles of French society are finally winning acclaim around the world. She talks about her relationship with her mother, feminism in France and being working-class Its rare for a writer to be self-conscious about the number of books lining the walls of their living room, particularly when they are one of Frances greatest living writers. But Annie Ernaux, whose sharp and often heartbreaking portraits of French daily life, class and society are enjoying a rush of interest in the English-speaking world, is aware that her bookshelves mark how far shes come from a working-class childhood in rural Normandy. Youve read all this? gasped one relative on a visit to her book-filled house on the outskirts of a …

An American great: Michiko Kakutani reflects on Toni Morrison’s legacy

Toni Morrison historical imagination and remarkable gifts of language made her one of the most influential writers of her generation In novels spanning several hundred years of history, Toni Morrison used her historical imagination and her remarkable gifts of language to chronicle the horrors of slavery and Jim Crow, and their continuing fallout on the everyday lives of black Americans. Violent, heart-wrenching events occur in her fiction: a runaway slave named Sethe cuts the throat of her baby daughter with a handsaw to spare her the fate she suffered herself as a slave ( The Death of Truth. The paperback edition will be released on 22 August.

Toni Morrison: farewell to America’s greatest writer we all owe her so much | Chigozie Obioma

Booker nominated author Chigozie Obioma reflects on losing a literary mother and her encouragement for generations of black and African writers to come It was with a heavy heart that I woke up, like many, to the news of the passing of the great African American writer Toni Morrison. As I have mourned and digested the news, my reaction has slowly gone from shock to dismay, then to a sense of inchoate peace. If we judge being old as a more feeble state, or characterised by a gradual withdrawal from work, then Morrison, like most great writers, had not become old. At the age of 88, she had continued to give us her stories and thoughts. The Source of Self-Regard …

Andrea Camilleri, beloved creator of Inspector Montalbano, dies aged 93

One of Italys most popular authors, Camilleri wrote 23 novels starring his Sicilian detective, selling more than 30m copies around the world One of Italys most popular authors and creator of the Inspector Montalbano series, Andrea Camilleri has died at the age of 93. Camilleri, who was born in Sicily in 1925, was taken to hospital in Rome in June after going into cardiac arrest. The author had written a handful of historical novels when, in 1994 at the age of almost 70, he wrote The Shape of Water, the first book starring his now famous Sicilian detective. Set in the fictional town of Vigata, Camilleri was originally going to call his central detective The Commissioner, but decided to pay …

Jeremy Corbyn on Joyce’s Ulysses: Dont beat yourself up if you dont understand it’

Politicians including Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg and the Labour leader have lined up to praise the impenetrable novel. Ahead of Bloomsday, Corbyn discusses the power of Joyces political vision In defiance of its reputation for being Philip Roth and Things Fall Apart is the book he returns to most. Ben Okris Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

From Agatha Christie to Gillian Flynn: 50 great thrillers by women

In response to a list of the 100 best crime novels that had only 28 female authors, Ann Cleeves, Val McDermid and Dreda Say Mitchell and other leading writers nominate some alternatives When the Sunday Times picked its The Franchise Affair by Josephine Tey A teenage war orphan accuses two women of kidnap and abuse, but something about her story doesnt add up. The Field of Blood by Denise Mina The first in the Paddy Meehan series sees the reporter looking into the disappearance of a child from his Glasgow home, with evidence pointing the police towards two young boys. A Fatal Inversion by Barbara Vine Writing under her pen name, Ruth Rendell tells of the discovery of a woman …

‘I’m not a gay writer, I’m a monster’: did James Purdy foresee Trump’s America?

At first he was feted. But then his novel about a handsome, Yale-educated serial rapist made him an outcast. Ten years after his death, has the scabrous authors time finally come? On 6 August 2015, the American author and playwright Cabot Wright Begins. A scabrous satire about three of New Yorks sacred cows publishing, politics and psychiatry the novel concerns the battle for the biographical rights of the titular Wright, a handsome, Yale-educated stockbroker and serial rapist. New York Times book critic Orville Prescott called it the sick outpouring of a confused, adolescent, distraught mind. A counter-attack from Susan Sontag hailed it as a bravura work of satire, but the damage was done. If my life up to then had …