Ooh, Matron! Why Carry On films refuse to remain dead

The return of Britains direst comedy franchise is thankfully nothing but a recurring rumour but the fact that its persisting is cause for national alarm Great news! The Carry On films are coming back! Finally, a win for Britain. We might have become the global punchline to an unfunny joke, and things are almost certainly going to get worse, and were all going to die penniless and humiliated, scavenging for food with our broken fingernails, but the Carry On films are coming back! At last, well get to show the world what were really good at: dirt cheap films that highlight our collective national fear of sexual arousal. Except theyre probably not coming back. Despite a flurry of excited noise …

Yesterday review predictable romcom

Danny Boyles fantasy about a world without the Beatles turns into a Richard Curtis greatest hits show This high-concept romantic comedy is billed as a collaboration between two of the most distinctive voices in British cinema. But, in fact, it is Danny Boyle rather drowned out by Curtiss instantly recognisable writing style. In fairness, its a style that has proven highly successful over the years: the joshing, bantering dialogue; the mannered inarticulacy with members of the opposite sex; the mortifying public declaration at the crest of the third act. But it feels a bit like an overfamiliar playlist of greatest hits. Theres a heart-sinking moment when you realise that you know exactly where the story is going. And you wish …

Men in Black: International review a galactically gormless fall to earth

This latest outing for the government agents tasked with policing pesky space invaders is a charmless and pointless affair Its time once again for what must now be called the Meh in Black, making another intensely tiresome and pointless reappearance, now with Chris Hemsworth on exceptionally charmless animatronic form in their dark suits, like Tussaud dummies with a contractual obligation to appear in a bad film. They are equally dead-eyed with or without the dark glasses. The MiB franchise based on Lowell Cunninghams 1990 comic book series about secret government agents battling aliens was looking pretty moribund at the time of the third film in 2012, when Josh Brolin gamely joined the familiar duo of Tommy Lee Jones and Will …

Best films of 2019 so far

Charlize Theron flips into funny with Seth Rogen, Mel Gibson picks Vince Vaughn as his accomplice and Avengers reach their Endgame the finest movies yet this year released in the UK The Favourite A New Years Day release date in the UK for Yorgos Lanthimoss period romp kicked the year off in fine style; Olivia Colmans Oscar win two months later was the crowning glory. What we said: A reminder that the idea of royalty as polite and picturesquely sentimental is something that came in with Queen Victoria: The Favourite is more punk than that. Its a rousingly nasty, bleary, hungover punchup. Read the full review An Impossible Love A daughters life is shaped by her fathers arrogance and her …

I Love My Mum review on the road from Morocco

In this unlikely comedy, a mother and son must find their way back to Essex after accidentally ending up in north Africa What does it say about the film industry that while Fish Tank, Kierston Wareing and Katie Jarvis, have been left behind in Its a Free World ) before Fish Tank, lands a starring role of sorts here, as a castrating mother in a scattershot comedy that sets out like a hybrid of Ray Cooney farce and Channel 4 reality show, and winds up making the most eccentric contribution yet to the recent wave of migration movies. Its heart remains broadly in the right place, yet there are points where you question just where its head is. I Love …

Someone Great review – another run-of-the-mill romcom from Netflix

Despite fine performances from Gina Rodriguez and Lakeith Stanfield, the debut film from Jennifer Kaytin Robinson never strays from the genres cliches Someone Great, a new Netflix original comedy written and directed by the first-time film-maker Jennifer Kaytin Robinson, is the kind of movie thats both undeniably of its time and still curiously rote. At times it plays like an uninterrupted torrent of memes and millennialisms, as though its attention to the parlance and particularities of contemporary urban life might disguise the fact that its otherwise a standard, paint-by-the-numbers buddy-romcom, in which three girlfriends two are on the heels of a breakup; the third has sworn off committed relationships ring in their sisterhood and their sorrows at a trendy music …

Fighting With My Family review Stephen Merchant has all the right moves

The writer-directors story of a British female wrestler striving to make it big in the US winningly balances oddball humour with affection for the antics of the WWE These are big movies, insists Michael Lerners studio boss in the Coen brothers 1991 hit Barton Fink, about big men in tights, both physically and mentally! Hes trying to explain to John Turturros angsty writer the inherent parameters of a wrestling movie, insisting: We dont put Wally Beery in a fruity movie about suffering. Yet just as William Faulkner reportedly did uncredited rewrites on Beerys 1932 picture Flesh, so writer-director Stephen Merchant here manages to subvert the genre and inject some of that Barton Fink feeling into this uplifting romp. Inspired by …