A world of walls: the brutish power of man-made barriers

Trumps border wall isnt unique. From Calais to Hungary, walls are always with us The latest atrocity in El Paso, when an avowed white supremacist drove for 10 hours to a supermarket used by Latino families in order to murder and maim, was explicitly motivated by Trumps baleful, anti-immigrant rhetoric. He was also a big fan of Trumps wall, which Trump himself has rhapsodically described as an impenetrable, physical, tall, powerful, beautiful southern border wall. Yet despite its Ozymandian ambition, the beautiful wall has stuttered and stumbled, still more frenzied rallying cry than bricks and mortar reality. Geography and logistics quietly conspire against it Americas border with Mexico is nearly 2,000 miles long, for a start. Incendiary talk of spiralling …

New cities in the sand: inside Egypts dream to conquer the desert

Four decades ago Egypt embarked on the most ambitious new cities building programme in the world. Their boom shows no sign of stopping Seen from space, Africa. This week Guardian Cities meets the 90-year-olds who built the Bulgarian city of Dimitrovgrad after the second world war (many still live there) and visits the bizarre Bahria Town development promising Karachi residents protection from terror attacks and violent crime. We look at Hong Kongs plan to build artificial islands for 1.1 million people and examine Egypts dream to conquer the Sahara. We remember past visions of future cities and ask, is there ever a good reason to start a city from scratch? Nick Van Mead Was this helpful? Thank you for your …

Schoolgirls for sale: why Tokyo struggles to stop the ‘JK business’

The persistent practice of paying underage girls for sex-related services, known in Japan as the JK business, has seen charities step in where police have come up short On a humid Wednesday night the streets of Kabukicho, Tokyos most famous red light district, hum with people. Some are tourists, here to gawp and take selfies, but others are customers. Adverts for clubs flash and sing and girls dressed as maids hold signs offering deals for local bars. In a grubby shopfront a perky cartoon featuring a cute Mr Men-style creature offers part-time work. The ad, which has an alarmingly catchy jingle, doesnt specify what the work is, but it doesnt need to: the answer is all around us on the …

‘He didn’t destroy me. We carry on. He lost’: survivors of terror attacks look back

From London to Nice, Berlin to Oslo, 11 people caught up in attacks across Europe reflect on the horror, the hope and the kindness of strangers. Portraits by Mathias Braschler and Monika Fischer Hager Ben Aouissi Promenade des Anglais, Nice, 14 July 2016 86 people killed, 450 wounded We had to roll underneath the truck. We were the only people to stand up again: Hager Ben Aouissi with her daughter Kenza I was there with my family. We were going home after the Bastille Day fireworks, but Kenza, who was four at the time, wanted something from the sweet stall, so we stopped with my father. He went on towards a toy stall and my mother and sister kept walking. …

‘Amsterdam is a cat city pretending to be a dog’ a cartoon

A dog city comes to you with its tail wagging, but cat cities like Amsterdam are more reticent and harder to judge, says artist Jan Rothuizen My drawings are best described as written maps or graphic reportages. These pieces are from my book Please Please Please Please Jan Rothuizen has published several books and exhibits his works internationally. His drawings are published monthly in Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant. He made the prize winning interactive documentary The Illustrated City series, email us at Twitter, Instagram to join the discussion, catch up on weekly newsletter

Forget tango: the murga of Buenos Aires is a riot of sequins and salvation

Freelance photographer Kate Stanworth has been following a Buenos Aires murga group for 10 years, as they perform in an energetic street carnival that is little known beyond Argentina Argentinas charismatic capital, Buenos Aires, might be more famous for tango, steak and football than colourful carnival parades. However, murga a feisty, home-grown form of street dance and percussion performed during carnival season, once unfairly thought of as only performed by drop-outs and drunks has flourished in recent years, providing a source of pride, happiness and salvation for the predominantly working class families that dedicate their lives to it. La Locura de Boedos band on a carnival night, playing the distinctive bass drums with cymbals, that are unique to the murga …