Johnson thinks a culture war will win crucial working-class votes. Hes wrong | Lynsey Hanley

Most leave supporters are not pining for a mythical lost community. They just want a better quality of life, says writer Lynsey Hanley Not long after the referendum in 2016, some neighbours suddenly erected a big wooden fence around their front garden. Well, it seemed sudden. Our postman jokingly called it the Brexit wall, and although the two events may have been entirely unconnected, the fence took on a symbolism it was probably never intended to have. Whether it was there for reasons of privacy, security, or simply to have something for the ivy to grow on, well never know. I dont like to ask. But the fence reinforced my belief that community life has never been, and never will …

Why The Third Man is an essential primer for no-deal Brexit

As the classic noir gets a 70th anniversary re-release, its hard to ignore the parallels between a shattered postwar Vienna teeming with spivs and the future the Brexiters have in mind What perfect timing for The Third Man to step back out of the shadows. Often hailed as the finest film Britain ever made, a 70th anniversary re-release will see it return to cinemas with the government much in the market for symbols of national grandeur. While Boris Johnson has named his favourite film as Dodgeball for once, eerily believable as the great British breakdown goes on it is easy to imagine him waving a tiny Union Jack at Carol Reeds majestic noir. It is true, of course, that there …

Home, sweet home: an emigrant’s view of Brexit photo essay

The British photographer Ed Alcock took French citizenship in 2018. He examines the UKs decision to leave the EU from a unique perspective Five dates anchor Paris-based photographer Ed Alcocks Home, Sweet Home: 1 January 1973, when Britain joined the EU; 11 April 1974, when he was born in Norwich; April 2000, when he moved to France; 23 June 2016, when the UK voted for Brexit; and 24 June 2018, when he became French. The cover of the New European, a newspaper founded in the weeks after the vote on Alcocks British passport (left) and a duplicate image with the words European Union removed I couldnt vote myself, said the photographer, who moved to France in 2000. But like all …

Muellers account of Trumps world acts as a cautionary tale for UK politics | Will Hutton

Senior figures in both countries behave as if they are above the law. Enough is enough Trump was right. His presidency was announced. Its tantamount to treasonous to work so closely with the Russian secret services during the campaign, with the Russians plainly hoping a Trump presidency would turn a blind eye to the subpoena by the House judicial committee for the full unredacted report is the first step. Democrat leaders may have misgivings about how impeachment will play out politically, but they have a constitutional and moral obligation to act against such a president with such a record. This behaviour sets new abysmal lows. Republican senators will almost certainly block the two-thirds majority needed to secure impeachment in the …

UK should leave EU with no deal, says former Bank of England governor

Mervyn King says Britain could ease dislocation costs with six months of planning The former governor of the Bank of England, issued repeat warnings that leaving the EU without a deal would cause significant economic damage and would damage living standards across the country. The Bank published a worst-case scenario last year that included Britain plunging into an Philip Hammond, the chancellor, not to accelerate spending to prepare the country for such a scenario had been disastrous and had cost the UKs bargaining power in talks with Brussels. Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

‘The Brexodus is under way’: meet the Brits leaving the UK

In the year after the Brexit vote, 17,000 British people sought citizenship of another EU country and many have since upped and left. Five Brexiles explain why theyre starting a new life overseas Last month, after a decade of living in London, my husband and I packed up the contents of our two-bedroom flat and moved to France with our 15-month-old son. With another baby on the way, were renting an apartment in Toulouse while we look for a more permanent setup. Leaving friends and family behind, and getting to grips with a new culture and language, hasnt been easy. But we have no plans to return to the UK. What sold us on France? The healthier work-life balance and …