JD Salinger estate finally agrees to ebook editions

Authors son explains that wish for accessibility has persuaded trustees to look past his fathers dislike of digital media After years of refusing to allow publishers to digitise his works, the estate of JD Salinger has announced that the authors famously small body of work will be published as ebooks for the first time. Salingers son Matt said that the author had always valued accessibility, but preferred the experience of reading a physical book. The Catcher in the Rye author, who died in 2010 at the age of 91, also hated the internet; Matt And in 2009, Fahrenheit 451 author Ray Bradbury told the New York Times: They wanted to put a book of mine on Yahoo! You know what …

From Baba Yaga to Hermione Granger: why we’re spellbound by ‘witcherature’

Vengeful, seductive, feminist, misogynist … witches have appeared in many forms in literature. Now a new generation of novelists are falling under their spell A witch is a woman who has too much power. Or, to quote the novelist #MeToo world, where Donald Trump a fan of the term witch-hunt is US president, it is really no surprise that female writers are examining the role of the witch in new ways. Since Trumps election, which inspired mass spell-casting by thousands of resistance witches (the selection of judge Circe, Millers reimagining of the story of the witch from the Odyssey. Shortlisted for the Womens prize and soon to become an HBO series, the novel sees Circe, a victim of rape, turn …

Greta effect leads to boom in childrens environmental books

The 16-year-old climate change activist has galvanised young people to read more about saving the planet Some seek to convey the wonder of endangered animals while others give tips on how to tackle waste or tell tales of inspirational environmental activists. All are part of what childrens publishers are calling the Greta Thunberg effect: a boom in books aimed at empowering young people to save the planet. The number of new childrens books looking at the climate crisis, global heating and the natural world has more than doubled over the past 12 months, according to data from Nielsen Book Research shared with the Observer. Sales have also doubled. Whether its beautifully illustrated factual books like Where the River Runs Gold …

Abortion, sex and family secrets: Annie Ernaux, France’s great truth teller

Ernauxs meticulously observed chronicles of French society are finally winning acclaim around the world. She talks about her relationship with her mother, feminism in France and being working-class Its rare for a writer to be self-conscious about the number of books lining the walls of their living room, particularly when they are one of Frances greatest living writers. But Annie Ernaux, whose sharp and often heartbreaking portraits of French daily life, class and society are enjoying a rush of interest in the English-speaking world, is aware that her bookshelves mark how far shes come from a working-class childhood in rural Normandy. Youve read all this? gasped one relative on a visit to her book-filled house on the outskirts of a …

An American great: Michiko Kakutani reflects on Toni Morrison’s legacy

Toni Morrison historical imagination and remarkable gifts of language made her one of the most influential writers of her generation In novels spanning several hundred years of history, Toni Morrison used her historical imagination and her remarkable gifts of language to chronicle the horrors of slavery and Jim Crow, and their continuing fallout on the everyday lives of black Americans. Violent, heart-wrenching events occur in her fiction: a runaway slave named Sethe cuts the throat of her baby daughter with a handsaw to spare her the fate she suffered herself as a slave ( The Death of Truth. The paperback edition will be released on 22 August.

Toni Morrison: farewell to America’s greatest writer we all owe her so much | Chigozie Obioma

Booker nominated author Chigozie Obioma reflects on losing a literary mother and her encouragement for generations of black and African writers to come It was with a heavy heart that I woke up, like many, to the news of the passing of the great African American writer Toni Morrison. As I have mourned and digested the news, my reaction has slowly gone from shock to dismay, then to a sense of inchoate peace. If we judge being old as a more feeble state, or characterised by a gradual withdrawal from work, then Morrison, like most great writers, had not become old. At the age of 88, she had continued to give us her stories and thoughts. The Source of Self-Regard …

I was a drug addict for nearly 20 years. There was nothing dignified or cool about it | Chris Fleming

I spent half my waking hours acquiring and using drugs and the other half trying to hide that fact Ive been an academic in the humanities now for almost 20 years, and so telling people that youre writing a book called On Drugs invites an inevitable series of nods, smirks and winks of jokes about doing empirical research in the area, of possibilities for applying for grants and getting funding. (While an addict, I would have certainly appreciated more funding.) One colleague, on hearing I was writing this book, joked that I should make up something juicy, like that I smoked crack, almost died and went through some fancy rehab. The fact, though I didnt say as much, was that …

Walking helped me discover the slow unfurling joy of reading books aloud | Patti Miller

On long treks through France, Spain and remote Australia, I discovered the rich wonder that comes from reading to a friend It began seven years ago in the hamlet of Ferreira in northern Spain. It was the sixth day of a long-distance walk and my feet had become increasingly sore. I sat outside the hostel, my feet up on a chair, feeling utterly dispirited. Ill read to you, said Anthony, my long-distance walking companion. Thatll fix you up. I was too tired to protest. Anthony hadnt read aloud to me before well, not more than a paragraph or two, which Id always felt as an imposition. I was too impatient for the slow pace of reading aloud. He pulled out …

Netflix’s The Witcher Makes a Play to Be the New Game of Thrones

Parks and Recreation's Ben Wyatt once not-quite-famously said of Game of Thrones that it was "not just for fantasy enthusiasts. They're telling human stories in a fantasy world." He was right. And now that Thrones is over, every network is looking to claim the crossover fantasy hit crown. Today, Netflix threw its hat—er, sword—into the ring at Comic-Con International with The Witcher. Peter Rubin Marvel's Games Are Starting to Feel a Lot Like Its Movies Adam Rogers So Long, You Weird, Space-Time-Defying Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. WIRED Staff It, Top Gun, His Dark Materials Trailers Rock Comic-Con Based on a book series by Andrzej Sapkowski that later got turned into a videogame franchise, the story follows Geralt of Rivia (Henry Cavill, …

Andrea Camilleri, beloved creator of Inspector Montalbano, dies aged 93

One of Italys most popular authors, Camilleri wrote 23 novels starring his Sicilian detective, selling more than 30m copies around the world One of Italys most popular authors and creator of the Inspector Montalbano series, Andrea Camilleri has died at the age of 93. Camilleri, who was born in Sicily in 1925, was taken to hospital in Rome in June after going into cardiac arrest. The author had written a handful of historical novels when, in 1994 at the age of almost 70, he wrote The Shape of Water, the first book starring his now famous Sicilian detective. Set in the fictional town of Vigata, Camilleri was originally going to call his central detective The Commissioner, but decided to pay …

Last Witnesses by Svetlana Alexievich review the astonishing achievement of the Nobel prize winner

From Chernobyl to the experience of children during the second world war … Alexievich has produced her own remarkable version of Soviet history In 1993, two years after Svetlana Alexievich published Boys in Zinc, her oral history of Russias war in Afghanistan, she was sued by a number of the people she had interviewed. They accused her of offending their honour and dignity and of portraying their soldier sons as soulless killer-robots, pillagers, drug addicts and racists. Though the case was in part thrown out, it said much about the fickleness of memory and the way that the rawness of grief conveyed to Alexievich during the interviews had quickly been overlaid by a more bearable narrative, in which the war …

Pride and prejudice: the best books to help with coming out

An exquisite kiss from Virginia Woolf, hot skin from Carol Ann Duffy Charlotte Mendelson picks books to inspire LGBTQ readers Everyone needs books, particularly the newly gay. Books make us feel less alone, and there is nothing more strengthening than reflections of our own complicated selves. Yet most of the best books that might help with coming out are simply about the private yearnings we try to hide. Bookshops rainbow-jacketed YA fiction displays will change young lives; thank God for that. But all over the world there are women and men to whom exposure would mean imprisonment, disaster. For them, and all those who arent riotously born that way, great coming out books are often those whose protagonists come out …

Jeremy Corbyn on Joyce’s Ulysses: Dont beat yourself up if you dont understand it’

Politicians including Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg and the Labour leader have lined up to praise the impenetrable novel. Ahead of Bloomsday, Corbyn discusses the power of Joyces political vision In defiance of its reputation for being Philip Roth and Things Fall Apart is the book he returns to most. Ben Okris Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

Pepe the Frog creator wins $15,000 settlement against Infowars

Victory is latest in a string of legal actions by Matt Furie, who is seeking to halt the co-option of his cartoon by the far right Matt Furie, the cartoonist behind the character and online meme Pepe the Frog, has won a $15,000 (12,000) settlement against website Infowars and its creator, the conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, over use of the anthropomorphic frog in far-right imagery. Pepe first appeared as a character in 2005 in Furies comic Boys Club, in which the peaceful frog-dude and his animal housemates got up to various college hijinks. His image quickly became a meme on MySpace, and later the anonymous message board 4chan, before it was co-opted by the US alt-right in the early 2010s. …

Men in Black: International review a galactically gormless fall to earth

This latest outing for the government agents tasked with policing pesky space invaders is a charmless and pointless affair Its time once again for what must now be called the Meh in Black, making another intensely tiresome and pointless reappearance, now with Chris Hemsworth on exceptionally charmless animatronic form in their dark suits, like Tussaud dummies with a contractual obligation to appear in a bad film. They are equally dead-eyed with or without the dark glasses. The MiB franchise based on Lowell Cunninghams 1990 comic book series about secret government agents battling aliens was looking pretty moribund at the time of the third film in 2012, when Josh Brolin gamely joined the familiar duo of Tommy Lee Jones and Will …

Goodbye X-MenYou Flawed, Frustrating Cinematic Revolution

The 1990s were a weird time if you liked comic books. A speculation boom and subsequent bust wiped away shops and publishers alike, and even Marvel—yes, Marvel—filed for bankruptcy in 1996. Yet the 1990s were even weirder if you wanted to see comic books on the big screen. Dick Tracy. The Rocketeer. The Phantom. Spawn. Judge Dredd. Jim Carrey in The Mask. Wesley Snipes as Blade. Even the Batman saga, which Tim Burton had kicked off with such promise, sputtered into garish weirdness. By 1999, moviegoers looking for something adapted from sequential art had their choice of exactly one film: Mystery Men, an ensemble comedy with a peripheral connection to an oddity called Flaming Carrot Comics. Graeme McMillan 5 Comics …