‘Most dangerous’ gang leader thanks police

But having served his sentence at HMP Grendon – a therapeutic community prison – he said he has “another chance at life.” “I could have ended up dead,” he said. “I could have ended up killing somebody. Who knows what would have happened. “Without prison, I don’t think I would have found a way out.” Image caption Carlus said he feels the damage his gang caused is “irreversible now” Mr Grant admitted he “terrorised” Allenton but said he was “100% sorry” for what he did. “I feel in some respects the damage we caused the community is kind of irreversible now.” he said. “It’s far from a glamorous lifestyle. “I feel like I owe a debt of trying to help, …

Trust’s ‘decade of failure’ to be reviewed

“The lack of timely safety improvements following their deaths is completely unacceptable and it’s important the NHS understands why this happened and what lessons can be learned to prevent the same mistakes happening again.” The review, to be led by NHS Improvement, will consider whether to recommend a public inquiry. Related Topics Mental health NHS Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

The ’embarrassing stain’ on history

“It’s a stain on history, a bit messy, embarrassing. There’s not a lot [of information] about, you really have to dig.” John Donovan, 33, and Mohammed Abdullah, 21, a fireman on a ship, died in Cardiff, while Frederick Henry Longman, a former soldier, died after being stabbed in Barry. Mr Abdullah died in hospital from a fractured skull after being attacked inside a boarding house in Bute Street. Mr Donovan, a former solider who worked on the railways, had been shot through his heart and lung at a house in Millicent Street – close to where the modern-day St David’s shopping centre now stands. It is claimed that there was a fourth victim, Harold Smart, 20. His throat was cut, …

Blanket free TV licence for over-75s scrapped

The number of households which could be eligible to apply for pension credit could number 1.5 million by 2020. The BBC Board said it was the “fairest option to help the poorest pensioners”. BBC chairman Sir David Clementi said it had been a “very difficult decision”. Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionDavid Clementi on the BBC’s decision to scrap blanket free licences for over 75s “We think it’s fair to those over 75 but also to all our audiences for whom there was no appetite for the level of cuts that would have been necessary if the concession had been extended,” he added. “There are people for whom this will be unwelcome news, who have not paid …

How Phil Mitchell ended up on Time cover

Cold War Steve, whose real name is Christopher Spencer, tells BBC News he was shopping in his local Asda in Birmingham when the “incredible” email offer came through last week. “I was in the condiment section and saw it was from Time magazine in New York and I was like, ‘bloody hell! This is it… break the States!’” he says. “As with Brexit, America and the Trump administration is such a rich seam for my kind of work and we were thinking how on earth would we take this British brand of satire and humour to America?” Image copyright Cold War Steve/Time Image caption Bungle can be seen selling tea and chips next to Phil Mitchell Follow us on Facebook, …

Diversity? Aftercare? How Love Island has changed

“When I was on Love Island, there was a lot about me being the only dark skinned girl but it didn’t really faze me much,” Samira Mighty, one of last year’s contestants, tells the Victoria Derbyshire show. “I think it would be great to see a lot more races in there… also you have got to remember they’ve got a show to make. They will pick personalities.” Perhaps more notably, the show also appears to have taken steps towards more body diversity. Iranian Instagram star Anna Vikili has a noticeably curvier frame than her fellow contestants. Image copyright ITV Image caption Caroline Flack says headlines surrounding the show’s aftercare made her “really angry” Other romance-based shows, such as as First …

‘Giving up booze helped me buy my house’

‘I’m done here’ “I wasn’t very happy – I was drinking a lot, going out a lot and not having the best time,” said Ms McAllister. “I hated how I felt the next day. “I hated the times I drank a lot and couldn’t remember anything. “Nights that started well, all dressed up and surrounded by my best friends would end in an argument, regrettable texts or a blackout not remembering how I got home.” Image copyright Laurie McAllister Image caption Laurie McAllister five days after going teetotal in December 2016 That day, she launched her blog Girl and Tonic, and wrote about the challenge of remembering she did not need to drink to have fun. Stopping drinking gave her …

D-Day landmarks listed for 75th anniversary

Image copyright Steven Baker Image caption Replica landing craft installations in Braunton Burrrows, Devon “As we commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day, it is right that we continue to honour the memory of those who fought for peace in one of the decisive moments of the Second World War,” Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright said. Image copyright Paul Pettitt Image caption Seven Army tanks lost during a D-Day rehearsal off Studland Beach in Dorset will be listed “Evidence of D-Day planning, rehearsal and the actual operation is all around us, on our coastline and in our waters, helping to tell the D-Day story,” said Duncan Wilson, chief executive of Historic England. “These tanks, armoured bulldozers, Mulberry harbour components and concrete training …

Breakdancing to help mental health fight

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionJamie Berry turned to breakdancing as an escape from bullying After years of bullying, when he was just 13 Jamie Berry tried to take his own life. Then Jamie turned to breakdancing – known as breaking – which he says has saved him from suicide numerous times. In Rhondda, he is using breaking to help others in a class which GPs can now refer people to. Public health experts hope community classes like Jamie’s, run by Avant Cymru in Cymmer, could help ease pressure on NHS services. “It’s a way to get the demon off my back and to be free,” he said. Image copyright Huw Dale Photography Image caption Jamie Berry …

Italian cafe to close after 84 years

Image caption Dom Balestrazzi in the Station Cafe with his daughter Anna In its heyday, the cafe was packed on a daily basis. “My parents used to come here in the 1960s when they were courting and apparently at that time it was the place to be in Treorchy on a Friday night,” said Nerys Bowen. The cafe still has regulars – schoolchildren come in before and after lessons along with those who have always come here. Islwyn Kingsley said he was sad at the news. Related Topics Treorchy Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

Does a hit song really need 9 writers?

“It’s a sign of the times,” says Jamie Scott, who wrote the first draft of These Days in a shed at the bottom of his garden. “You go into a [songwriting] session and there are five people in a session and, if everyone is doing a great job, then there’s going to be five people on the credits. “And if they’re not, then next time there are going to be four people in the session.” Skip Youtube post by Rudimental Warning: Third party content may contain adverts Report Scott says songwriting teams have blossomed because streaming services demand a constant supply of new material: An artist who wants to stay at the front of fans’ minds needs to put out …

‘I thought he was playing an innocent game’

But, over time, she noticed a change in his behaviour. He would no longer want to join in with family activities he usually enjoyed. Concerned, she decided to check the game – and discovered he had been communicating with others on a third-party app. It was at that point she realised her son had been groomed into sending sexually explicit images of himself. “We came across some pictures,” she tells the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “It was horrifying. I was physically sick.” Roblox told the programme it was unable to comment on individual cases but was committed to protecting the online safety of children. It said its in-game chat had very stringent filters and any photo exchange would have been …

Netball counts down to ‘summer of excitement’

‘Fan experience’ Ms Impett says the international landscape is now much more competitive than in the run up to previous world cups. “I think in 2019 we are in better position for a potential change than ever before. Australia are the best team in the world at the moment, but potentially more open to losing their world title than they have ever been before,” she says. Image copyright LFC Foundation/Getty Image caption There will be a number of fan events around the World Cup in Liverpool It is hoped that as well as taking in the netball, visitors will go to some of Liverpool’s attractions such as the Beatles Museum, or enjoy the wider region, such as visiting the Lake …

Dustin Lance Black’s childhood of love and fear

Image copyright Dustin Lance Black Image caption Black and his mother Anne: “I was raising her as much as she was raising me” “I had all the information to know how much trouble I was in. I was a Mormon and we were a military family in Texas. I had heard the word homosexual inside the Mormon church and the Prophet (church leader) at that time was saying it was a sin akin to murder. “So I had heard lots of colourful words, almost all pejorative, about these feelings that I had for this kid down the block. “Whatever little butterflies I had in my stomach turned to terror within seconds. I was going to hell and I would bring …

How we uncovered abuse at specialist hospital

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionUndercover BBC filming shows staff swearing, mocking and taunting patients with autism and learning disabilities Eight years ago I worked with a team at BBC One’s Panorama programme to reveal terrible physical abuse at a hospital for vulnerable adults on the outskirts of Bristol, called Winterbourne View. People with learning disabilities or autism were filmed by our undercover reporter being kicked, punched, mocked and mistreated by people paid to care for them. As the producer of that film, I worked with whistleblowers to gather evidence, hired the undercover reporter and oversaw his filming. Nearly a dozen people who had worked at Winterbourne View were prosecuted afterwards as a result of our evidence. …

Whorlton Hall ‘abuse warnings’ ignored

An undercover BBC Panorama investigation into the specialist hospital in County Durham – a 17-bed unit for adults with learning difficulties and autism – appeared to show patients being mocked, intimidated and restrained. Cygnet, the firm that runs the 17-bed hospital unit for adults with learning difficulties and autism, said it was “shocked and deeply saddened” by the allegations. The company only took over the running of the centre at the turn of the year and said it was “co-operating fully” with the police investigation. ‘Poor culture’ The site had at least 100 visits by official agencies in the year before the alleged abuse was discovered. Mr Stanley-Wilkinson says he noticed a “very poor culture” was evident when he led …