TopNews - Feed https://topnews.pw news , tips , tricks Sat, 15 Dec 2018 23:45:22 +0000 en-US https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0.1 https://topnews.pw/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/cropped-ama-news-logo-32x32.pngTopNews – news , tips , trickshttps://topnews.pw 32 32 124120822 The Ugly Truth About Tampons And Padshttps://topnews.pw/the-ugly-truth-about-tampons-and-pads/ Sat, 15 Dec 2018 23:42:23 +0000 https://topnews.pw/?p=624

Every month, the ritual for most menstruators in America is the same: Slap on a sanitary napkin or unwrap a tampon, and life goes on, NBD. But it turns out this mindless habit might be wreaking havoc on the planet — and your health, too.

Disposable tampons or pads are the go-to menstrual hygiene product for an overwhelming majority of menstruating Americans, with a reported 98 percent using either or both products every month. The average woman ― and transgender and nonbinary person who menstruates ― will spend approximately 2,280 days on their period and use more than 11,000 tampons or pads over the course of their lifetime. Yet many are unaware of the risky ingredients that these products can contain and what happens to them once they’re tossed out.

Manufacturers aren’t required to disclose ingredients in tampons and pads since they’re considered medical devices by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but what we do know about the makeup of these products has compelled health experts and sustainability advocates to raise the alarm.

Most disposable tampons and pads and their packaging contain nonbiodegradable — and potentially toxic — plastic and other synthetic materials like glue (most tampon cords are glued rather than woven in) and petrochemical additives. A package of conventional sanitary pads can contain the equivalent of about four plastic bags.

Most tampons and pads also contain bleached and nonorganic cotton, rayon, wood pulp, or a combination of these materials. Nonorganic cotton and rayon are known to contain pesticides and herbicides including diuron, a chemical that the Environmental Protection Agency has dubbed a “likely” carcinogen, and dioxin, a toxin which the World Health Organization has linked to immune system suppression, reproductive problems and cancer.

The FDA has said that the amount of dioxin an average tampon or pad user absorbs would likely be too negligible to cause harm. But as Dr. Philip Tierno, director of clinical microbiology at the New York University Medical Center, explained to Time magazine, even trace amounts of dioxin are cause for concern as a lifetime of exposure could theoretically increase a person’s risks for disease. 

Preliminary research suggests that the plastic in menstrual hygiene products could pose potential health hazards, too. 

Given these possible risks, Shradha Shreejaya, a women’s health activist and sustainable menstruation advocate, said consumers have the right to know what their tampons and pads contain.

“Tampons and pads get so close to our body and our sensitive tissue. Think about how much exposure you get to these products over the years. The very minimum that we should demand is to know what goes inside these products,” Shreejaya told HuffPost over Skype from Thailand last week. 

The composition of these products also matters from an environmental standpoint, given the staggering amount of waste ― and pollution ― they generate every year. 

Worldwide, it’s estimated that over 100 billion menstrual hygiene products are disposed of annually. In North America alone, about 20 billion sanitary napkins, tampons and tampon applicators — which are not recyclable, since they’ve been in contact with human waste — are dumped into landfills yearly.

(Figure out how much waste you’ll personally generate in a lifetime with this menstrual waste calculator.) 

Since these items contain plastic, which does not biodegrade, it’ll take at least 500 to 800 years for each pad and tampon to decompose. When incinerated — a common practice in some developing nations — these products release toxic fumes, including carbon dioxide.

Researchers in Stockholm concluded that the plastic back-strip of a sanitary napkin, as well as plastic tampon applicators ― both of which are typically made from low-density polyethylene ― are particularly damaging to the planet. They not only take centuries to break down but also require high amounts of fossil fuel to make.

The manufacturing of disposable menstrual hygiene products (an almost $6 billion industry) generates a total carbon footprint of about 15 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually, according to the United Nations Environment Program. That’s the equivalent of burning about 35 million barrels of oil.

Disposable tampons, pads and applicators are also polluting waterways and harming marine wildlife, according to Nick Mallos, director of the Trash Free Seas program at Ocean Conservancy. 

Mallos said the nonprofit collected 27,938 used tampons and applicators on beaches around the world in a single day in 2015. A recent report by the European Commission concluded that disposable menstrual products are the fifth most common type of waste washing up on beaches.

“The numbers of these products that are found near and in waterways are pretty astonishing in many parts of the world,” Mallos said. 

How, you might be wondering, are pads and tampons ending up en masse in rivers and seas? The problem, Mallos explained, is that many people are flushing tampons ― and pads too ― down the toilet.

Yes, that’s right: Flushing either of these items is a huge no-no

Flushed tampons, pads, applicators and other items can end up clogging sewer pipes, which can cause untreated wastewater to overflow. This wastewater can eventually make its way to creeks, streams and rivers.

Not flushing tampons and pads down the toilet is one thing that everyone can do immediately to help enact change.

Nearly half of all menstruators in the U.K. say they flush their tampons. According to figures published in the Journal of the Institution of Environmental Sciences, about 2.5 million tampons, 1.4 million sanitary napkins and 700,000 panty liners are flushed down the toilet in the U.K. every single day

“A good rule of thumb is to never throw stuff in the toilet” that’s not the three Ps (paper, poop or pee), Mallos said. “It’s just not a good pathway for proper disposal.” 

Even if flushed menstrual products “make it to waste treatment plants, the material that’s captured there has to end up somewhere, and unfortunately that can often end up near waterways too,” Mallos said.  

Other than adding to the mammoth problem of ocean plastic pollution, experts say menstrual hygiene products that end up on beaches or waterways pose an additional threat of spreading possible disease and pathogens because of the bodily waste they contain. Communities living near waterways could be at risk, as could marine wildlife that often mistakes plastic products as food. 

“Just like in landfills, if a tampon or pad ends up in a waterway, it can just get embedded into the ocean bed or riverbed and it won’t go anywhere for hundreds of years,” Shreejaya said. 

Not flushing tampons and pads down the toilet is one thing that everyone can do immediately to help enact change. Here are some other steps you could take to make your period more sustainable (and potentially healthier):   

1) Choose reusable menstrual hygiene products like menstrual cups, period underwear and reusable sanitary napkins. 

Getty Images
The modern menstrual cup dates back to at least the 1930s, but mainstream interest has only started burgeoning in recent years.

Instead of using disposable pads and tampons that are discarded after just one use, consider using reusable products instead.

The menstrual cup is one product that’s been gaining in popularity. Usually made of medical-grade silicone, menstrual cups are inserted into the vagina, where they collect blood during menstruation.

When inserted correctly, menstrual cups are “more convenient and comfortable than tampons and can be worn for 12 hours,” said Kim Rosas, co-founder of Put A Cup In It, the popular vlog and blog about menstrual cups. “You won’t even feel it’s there.” 

Though the history of the menstrual cup in the U.S. dates back to at least the 1930s, Rosas said the product has only recently entered mainstream consciousness. 

“We’ve witnessed a huge change from even just a few years ago,” Rosas said. “When I first started using a cup about seven years ago, there was almost no information about the cup online and not many people knew about it. Now, menstrual cup usage is still fairly low but more people at least know that it exists as an option.”

Amanda Hearn, the other co-founder of Put A Cup In It, said the most common reaction she hears from menstrual cup converts is “I wish I had discovered the cup sooner.” 

“People don’t realize how irritating and drying tampons are until they use a cup,” she said. 

Hearn and Rosas advise first-time cup users to do their research before making a purchase. Cups come in a range of sizes and shapes, so having some understanding of your cervix size can help ensure you find a cup that works best for your body. Put A Cup In It has a nine-question quiz to help menstruators find the right product. 

Inserting and removing the cup can also take some getting used to. There is plenty of instructional content online to teach newbies how to use the cup correctly. But if you don’t get it perfect the first time, don’t lose hope! 

“Give it a chance. It’s a totally new product, so it might take some time to figure out,” Hearn said. “And don’t be afraid to reach out for help if you need it.” 

Menstrual cups may ultimately not be the best option for some menstruators, however. People without access to proper sanitation and those with certain health conditions may not be able to use the cup safely and to best effect. 

Other reusable options include period underwear, which is like normal underwear but can absorb flow without leaking if used correctly. Reusable pads made of sustainable materials are also an option. A U.K.-based start-up called DAME unveiled the world’s first reusable tampon applicator last year.  

Though reusable products are a bigger financial investment up front compared to disposable menstrual hygiene products, reusables can ― in the long run ― save you thousands of dollars.

A typical menstrual cup can, for instance, be used for up to a decade. Assuming a cup costs about $40, that works out to about 33 cents for every period. 

2) When disposables are necessary, choose organic if you can ― and support transparent brands. 

Getty Images
Organic cotton is harvested from non-genetically modified plants and grown without the use of synthetic chemicals like fertilizers and pesticides.

There may, of course, be times when you need to use disposable menstrual hygiene products. If those occasions arise, opt for organic products when possible and choose brands that are transparent about the materials they use.

The term “organic” is not always fail-proof, but if buying from a trustworthy source, organic tampons and pads should from cotton that has not been treated with pesticides and other nasty chemicals. 

3) Demand that corporations make plastic-free sanitary products.

Getty Creative
A viral Change.org petition has demanded that companies remove all plastic from their menstrual hygiene products. 

Sustainability advocate Ella Daish started a viral Change.org petition earlier this year calling on all companies to nix plastic from their menstrual hygiene products. 

“With the problems of single-use plastic gaining huge media attention, it is now clear more than ever that it is having an adverse effect on health, wildlife and the environment,” Daish told Glamour magazine in July. “It is crucial that these mass-produced products become plastic-free so that they inflict minimum damage ... whilst the use of plastic is appropriate in certain circumstances, it is certainly not essential for our period products.”

More than 106,000 people have signed the petition thus far. 

“By signing the petition, you are calling upon manufacturers to take responsibility for the unnecessary plastic they use whilst raising awareness of this important issue. And the great news is, by going green on your flow, by opting for plastic-free alternatives, you can make real change happen!” Daish told Glamour.

Some of the market’s biggest players are evidently paying attention to the growing consumer demand for more sustainable sanitary products.

Tampon pioneer Tampax unveiled its first-ever menstrual cup in October. A spokeswoman for the company told HelloGiggles at the time that Tampax launched the Tampax Cup to “enter a small, but fast-growing segment to reach, connect, and delight millennials.”

4) Urge lawmakers to pass legislation to make disclosing ingredients mandatory. 

A bill calling for the mandatory disclosure of all ingredients in menstrual hygiene products has been languishing in Congress since it was introduced by Rep. Grace Meng (D-N.Y.) in 2017.

The Menstrual Products Right to Know Act “requires menstrual products, such as menstrual cups, menstrual pads, tampons, and therapeutic vaginal douche apparatuses, to include a list of ingredients on the label.”

“We want women to be able to know what chemicals are in these products, which come in direct contact with our bodies,” Meng said last year, according to The New York Times

Sustainability and health experts say consumers and policymakers need to know what’s in menstrual products so they can make informed decisions about their own personal health, as well as to address the wider issue of how to properly dispose of these items.

“There’s a major lack of accountability among the big manufacturers,” said Shreejaya. “They urgently need to disclose their ingredients and be part of the conversation.”

5) Help make menstruation a bigger public policy priority. 

Reuters
Periods should be sustainable, affordable and equitable for all menstruators. Advocates in the U.S. have recently pushed for improved access to menstrual products in correctional facilities, shelters and schools, and for the abolishment of sales tax on menstrual products.

The ultimate goal, Shreejaya said, is to ensure that periods are more sustainable, affordable and equitable for all people who menstruate worldwide. Plastic-free sanitary products, she said, are just a part of the equation. 

“We need to tackle this holistically,” Shreejaya said. “And that means menstruation needs to be recognized as a major public health priority. In many countries, there’s a lack of supporting infrastructure like clean toilets and access to water. And when it comes to menstrual hygiene products, we don’t have choice unless we are privileged.”

Globally, periods are keeping girls out of school, and many people who menstruate can’t afford or don’t have access to safe menstrual hygiene products. Lingering cultural stigma about periods has also continued to endanger the health ― and sometimes the lives ― of people who menstruate.

As the New Republic noted in May, stigma could be one reason why menstruators in the U.S. have shied away from using reusable products like the menstrual cup, which can require users to get more intimate with their flow. 

“Though a monthly normalcy for around two billion people worldwide, menstruation rarely appears in American popular culture,” the magazine wrote. “When it does, as Lauren Rosewarne demonstrated in her 2012 book Periods in Pop Culture, it’s often treated as a source of embarrassment and shame, whether for comedic or dramatic purposes; sometimes it’s even a source of evil, as in the 1976 horror film Carrie.”

And “the very fact of menstruation seems to appall the president,” New Republic added, referring to Donald Trump’s infamous 2015 jab at journalist Megyn Kelly, who he said had “blood coming out of her wherever.” 

“There’s still so much shame and stigma around this topic,” said Shreejaya. “This has got to change.”

This series is funded by SC Johnson. All content is editorially independent, with no influence or input from the company.

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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Post Source Here: The Ugly Truth About Tampons And Pads
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Every month, the ritual for most menstruators in America is the same: Slap on a sanitary napkin or unwrap a tampon, and life goes on, NBD. But it turns out this mindless habit might be wreaking havoc on the planet — and your health, too.

Disposable tampons or pads are the go-to menstrual hygiene product for an overwhelming majority of menstruating Americans, with a reported 98 percent using either or both products every month. The average woman ― and transgender and nonbinary person who menstruates ― will spend approximately 2,280 days on their period and use more than 11,000 tampons or pads over the course of their lifetime. Yet many are unaware of the risky ingredients that these products can contain and what happens to them once they’re tossed out.

Manufacturers aren’t required to disclose ingredients in tampons and pads since they’re considered medical devices by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but what we do know about the makeup of these products has compelled health experts and sustainability advocates to raise the alarm.

Most disposable tampons and pads and their packaging contain nonbiodegradable — and potentially toxic — plastic and other synthetic materials like glue (most tampon cords are glued rather than woven in) and petrochemical additives. A package of conventional sanitary pads can contain the equivalent of about four plastic bags.

Most tampons and pads also contain bleached and nonorganic cotton, rayon, wood pulp, or a combination of these materials. Nonorganic cotton and rayon are known to contain pesticides and herbicides including diuron, a chemical that the Environmental Protection Agency has dubbed a “likely” carcinogen, and dioxin, a toxin which the World Health Organization has linked to immune system suppression, reproductive problems and cancer.

The FDA has said that the amount of dioxin an average tampon or pad user absorbs would likely be too negligible to cause harm. But as Dr. Philip Tierno, director of clinical microbiology at the New York University Medical Center, explained to Time magazine, even trace amounts of dioxin are cause for concern as a lifetime of exposure could theoretically increase a person’s risks for disease. 

Preliminary research suggests that the plastic in menstrual hygiene products could pose potential health hazards, too. 

Given these possible risks, Shradha Shreejaya, a women’s health activist and sustainable menstruation advocate, said consumers have the right to know what their tampons and pads contain.

“Tampons and pads get so close to our body and our sensitive tissue. Think about how much exposure you get to these products over the years. The very minimum that we should demand is to know what goes inside these products,” Shreejaya told HuffPost over Skype from Thailand last week. 

The composition of these products also matters from an environmental standpoint, given the staggering amount of waste ― and pollution ― they generate every year. 

Worldwide, it’s estimated that over 100 billion menstrual hygiene products are disposed of annually. In North America alone, about 20 billion sanitary napkins, tampons and tampon applicators — which are not recyclable, since they’ve been in contact with human waste — are dumped into landfills yearly.

(Figure out how much waste you’ll personally generate in a lifetime with this menstrual waste calculator.) 

Since these items contain plastic, which does not biodegrade, it’ll take at least 500 to 800 years for each pad and tampon to decompose. When incinerated — a common practice in some developing nations — these products release toxic fumes, including carbon dioxide.

Researchers in Stockholm concluded that the plastic back-strip of a sanitary napkin, as well as plastic tampon applicators ― both of which are typically made from low-density polyethylene ― are particularly damaging to the planet. They not only take centuries to break down but also require high amounts of fossil fuel to make.

The manufacturing of disposable menstrual hygiene products (an almost $6 billion industry) generates a total carbon footprint of about 15 million tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually, according to the United Nations Environment Program. That’s the equivalent of burning about 35 million barrels of oil.

Disposable tampons, pads and applicators are also polluting waterways and harming marine wildlife, according to Nick Mallos, director of the Trash Free Seas program at Ocean Conservancy. 

Mallos said the nonprofit collected 27,938 used tampons and applicators on beaches around the world in a single day in 2015. A recent report by the European Commission concluded that disposable menstrual products are the fifth most common type of waste washing up on beaches.

“The numbers of these products that are found near and in waterways are pretty astonishing in many parts of the world,” Mallos said. 

How, you might be wondering, are pads and tampons ending up en masse in rivers and seas? The problem, Mallos explained, is that many people are flushing tampons ― and pads too ― down the toilet.

Yes, that’s right: Flushing either of these items is a huge no-no

Flushed tampons, pads, applicators and other items can end up clogging sewer pipes, which can cause untreated wastewater to overflow. This wastewater can eventually make its way to creeks, streams and rivers.

Not flushing tampons and pads down the toilet is one thing that everyone can do immediately to help enact change.

Nearly half of all menstruators in the U.K. say they flush their tampons. According to figures published in the Journal of the Institution of Environmental Sciences, about 2.5 million tampons, 1.4 million sanitary napkins and 700,000 panty liners are flushed down the toilet in the U.K. every single day

“A good rule of thumb is to never throw stuff in the toilet” that’s not the three Ps (paper, poop or pee), Mallos said. “It’s just not a good pathway for proper disposal.” 

Even if flushed menstrual products “make it to waste treatment plants, the material that’s captured there has to end up somewhere, and unfortunately that can often end up near waterways too,” Mallos said.  

Other than adding to the mammoth problem of ocean plastic pollution, experts say menstrual hygiene products that end up on beaches or waterways pose an additional threat of spreading possible disease and pathogens because of the bodily waste they contain. Communities living near waterways could be at risk, as could marine wildlife that often mistakes plastic products as food. 

“Just like in landfills, if a tampon or pad ends up in a waterway, it can just get embedded into the ocean bed or riverbed and it won’t go anywhere for hundreds of years,” Shreejaya said. 

Not flushing tampons and pads down the toilet is one thing that everyone can do immediately to help enact change. Here are some other steps you could take to make your period more sustainable (and potentially healthier):   

1) Choose reusable menstrual hygiene products like menstrual cups, period underwear and reusable sanitary napkins. 

Getty Images
The modern menstrual cup dates back to at least the 1930s, but mainstream interest has only started burgeoning in recent years.

Instead of using disposable pads and tampons that are discarded after just one use, consider using reusable products instead.

The menstrual cup is one product that’s been gaining in popularity. Usually made of medical-grade silicone, menstrual cups are inserted into the vagina, where they collect blood during menstruation.

When inserted correctly, menstrual cups are “more convenient and comfortable than tampons and can be worn for 12 hours,” said Kim Rosas, co-founder of Put A Cup In It, the popular vlog and blog about menstrual cups. “You won’t even feel it’s there.” 

Though the history of the menstrual cup in the U.S. dates back to at least the 1930s, Rosas said the product has only recently entered mainstream consciousness. 

“We’ve witnessed a huge change from even just a few years ago,” Rosas said. “When I first started using a cup about seven years ago, there was almost no information about the cup online and not many people knew about it. Now, menstrual cup usage is still fairly low but more people at least know that it exists as an option.”

Amanda Hearn, the other co-founder of Put A Cup In It, said the most common reaction she hears from menstrual cup converts is “I wish I had discovered the cup sooner.” 

“People don’t realize how irritating and drying tampons are until they use a cup,” she said. 

Hearn and Rosas advise first-time cup users to do their research before making a purchase. Cups come in a range of sizes and shapes, so having some understanding of your cervix size can help ensure you find a cup that works best for your body. Put A Cup In It has a nine-question quiz to help menstruators find the right product. 

Inserting and removing the cup can also take some getting used to. There is plenty of instructional content online to teach newbies how to use the cup correctly. But if you don’t get it perfect the first time, don’t lose hope! 

“Give it a chance. It’s a totally new product, so it might take some time to figure out,” Hearn said. “And don’t be afraid to reach out for help if you need it.” 

Menstrual cups may ultimately not be the best option for some menstruators, however. People without access to proper sanitation and those with certain health conditions may not be able to use the cup safely and to best effect. 

Other reusable options include period underwear, which is like normal underwear but can absorb flow without leaking if used correctly. Reusable pads made of sustainable materials are also an option. A U.K.-based start-up called DAME unveiled the world’s first reusable tampon applicator last year.  

Though reusable products are a bigger financial investment up front compared to disposable menstrual hygiene products, reusables can ― in the long run ― save you thousands of dollars.

A typical menstrual cup can, for instance, be used for up to a decade. Assuming a cup costs about $40, that works out to about 33 cents for every period. 

2) When disposables are necessary, choose organic if you can ― and support transparent brands. 

Getty Images
Organic cotton is harvested from non-genetically modified plants and grown without the use of synthetic chemicals like fertilizers and pesticides.

There may, of course, be times when you need to use disposable menstrual hygiene products. If those occasions arise, opt for organic products when possible and choose brands that are transparent about the materials they use.

The term “organic” is not always fail-proof, but if buying from a trustworthy source, organic tampons and pads should from cotton that has not been treated with pesticides and other nasty chemicals. 

3) Demand that corporations make plastic-free sanitary products.

Getty Creative
A viral Change.org petition has demanded that companies remove all plastic from their menstrual hygiene products. 

Sustainability advocate Ella Daish started a viral Change.org petition earlier this year calling on all companies to nix plastic from their menstrual hygiene products. 

“With the problems of single-use plastic gaining huge media attention, it is now clear more than ever that it is having an adverse effect on health, wildlife and the environment,” Daish told Glamour magazine in July. “It is crucial that these mass-produced products become plastic-free so that they inflict minimum damage ... whilst the use of plastic is appropriate in certain circumstances, it is certainly not essential for our period products.”

More than 106,000 people have signed the petition thus far. 

“By signing the petition, you are calling upon manufacturers to take responsibility for the unnecessary plastic they use whilst raising awareness of this important issue. And the great news is, by going green on your flow, by opting for plastic-free alternatives, you can make real change happen!” Daish told Glamour.

Some of the market’s biggest players are evidently paying attention to the growing consumer demand for more sustainable sanitary products.

Tampon pioneer Tampax unveiled its first-ever menstrual cup in October. A spokeswoman for the company told HelloGiggles at the time that Tampax launched the Tampax Cup to “enter a small, but fast-growing segment to reach, connect, and delight millennials.”

4) Urge lawmakers to pass legislation to make disclosing ingredients mandatory. 

A bill calling for the mandatory disclosure of all ingredients in menstrual hygiene products has been languishing in Congress since it was introduced by Rep. Grace Meng (D-N.Y.) in 2017.

The Menstrual Products Right to Know Act “requires menstrual products, such as menstrual cups, menstrual pads, tampons, and therapeutic vaginal douche apparatuses, to include a list of ingredients on the label.”

“We want women to be able to know what chemicals are in these products, which come in direct contact with our bodies,” Meng said last year, according to The New York Times

Sustainability and health experts say consumers and policymakers need to know what’s in menstrual products so they can make informed decisions about their own personal health, as well as to address the wider issue of how to properly dispose of these items.

“There’s a major lack of accountability among the big manufacturers,” said Shreejaya. “They urgently need to disclose their ingredients and be part of the conversation.”

5) Help make menstruation a bigger public policy priority. 

Reuters
Periods should be sustainable, affordable and equitable for all menstruators. Advocates in the U.S. have recently pushed for improved access to menstrual products in correctional facilities, shelters and schools, and for the abolishment of sales tax on menstrual products.

The ultimate goal, Shreejaya said, is to ensure that periods are more sustainable, affordable and equitable for all people who menstruate worldwide. Plastic-free sanitary products, she said, are just a part of the equation. 

“We need to tackle this holistically,” Shreejaya said. “And that means menstruation needs to be recognized as a major public health priority. In many countries, there’s a lack of supporting infrastructure like clean toilets and access to water. And when it comes to menstrual hygiene products, we don’t have choice unless we are privileged.”

Globally, periods are keeping girls out of school, and many people who menstruate can’t afford or don’t have access to safe menstrual hygiene products. Lingering cultural stigma about periods has also continued to endanger the health ― and sometimes the lives ― of people who menstruate.

As the New Republic noted in May, stigma could be one reason why menstruators in the U.S. have shied away from using reusable products like the menstrual cup, which can require users to get more intimate with their flow. 

“Though a monthly normalcy for around two billion people worldwide, menstruation rarely appears in American popular culture,” the magazine wrote. “When it does, as Lauren Rosewarne demonstrated in her 2012 book Periods in Pop Culture, it’s often treated as a source of embarrassment and shame, whether for comedic or dramatic purposes; sometimes it’s even a source of evil, as in the 1976 horror film Carrie.”

And “the very fact of menstruation seems to appall the president,” New Republic added, referring to Donald Trump’s infamous 2015 jab at journalist Megyn Kelly, who he said had “blood coming out of her wherever.” 

“There’s still so much shame and stigma around this topic,” said Shreejaya. “This has got to change.”

This series is funded by SC Johnson. All content is editorially independent, with no influence or input from the company.

Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

=>
***********************************************
Post Source Here: The Ugly Truth About Tampons And Pads
************************************
=>

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624
CBS donates $20 million of Les Moonves’ severance to 18 women’s advocacy groupshttps://topnews.pw/cbs-donates-20-million-of-les-moonves-severance-to-18-womens-advocacy-groups/ Sat, 15 Dec 2018 19:26:03 +0000 https://topnews.pw/?p=621

(CNN)On the day Les Moonves was forced out of CBS in September, $20 million from his severance was earmarked for donations.

On Friday, the self-imposed deadline to announce the grant recipients, CBS named 18 groups that are receiving donations. Two of the groups will "disburse smaller grants to additional organizations," CBS said.
With the help of an advisory firm called RALLY, CBS came up with three goals that underpin the initiative: "Increasing the number of women in positions of power, promoting education and culture change, and supporting victims of harassment and assault."
    In a joint statement, the recipients said "the contributions are a step to driving real progress toward ending the national epidemic of sexual violence and harassment."
    "We thank CBS for these donations," the joint statement said. "We also recognize these funds are not a panacea, nor do they erase or absolve decades of bad behavior."
    The grantees include Catalyst, the Freedom Forum Institute's Power Shift Project, the International Women's Media Foundation, Press Forward, the TIME'S UP Legal Defense Fund, and the Women's Media Center.
    One of the other recipients, RAINN, operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline.
    "This generous support will make it possible for us to help tens of thousands more survivors," the group's president Scott Berkowitz said.
    Moonves was not mentioned by name in the press release. It only said the "grant announcement is part of the Company's separation agreement with the Company's former chief executive officer."
    But the donations are a reminder that the company has yet to decide what to do about the rest of his severance. Under the terms of his enormously generous employment contract, Moonves was owed about $140 million. When he was ousted, $20 million was set aside for grants and the remaining $120 million was set up in a trust.
    The money is still in a holding pattern while the CBS board determines whether Moonves could be fired for cause, giving the company reason to claw back the $120 million. According to a draft report by two law firms that was obtained by The New York Times, lawyers working for the board have found multiple reasons for the board to consider Moonves fired for cause.
      Moonves has denied any nonconsensual sexual relations. His lawyer says he has fully cooperated with the law firm investigators.
      It is unclear if the lawyers' findings about Moonves and CBS will be made public. The grant recipients brought this up in the joint statement on Friday: "We look forward to receiving the full results of the investigation into Mr. Moonves and an update on additional concrete commitments that CBS - and all organizations - will make to support lasting change."

      Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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      Article Source Here: CBS donates $20 million of Les Moonves’ severance to 18 women’s advocacy groups
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      (CNN)On the day Les Moonves was forced out of CBS in September, $20 million from his severance was earmarked for donations.

      On Friday, the self-imposed deadline to announce the grant recipients, CBS named 18 groups that are receiving donations. Two of the groups will "disburse smaller grants to additional organizations," CBS said.
      With the help of an advisory firm called RALLY, CBS came up with three goals that underpin the initiative: "Increasing the number of women in positions of power, promoting education and culture change, and supporting victims of harassment and assault."
        In a joint statement, the recipients said "the contributions are a step to driving real progress toward ending the national epidemic of sexual violence and harassment."
        "We thank CBS for these donations," the joint statement said. "We also recognize these funds are not a panacea, nor do they erase or absolve decades of bad behavior."
        The grantees include Catalyst, the Freedom Forum Institute's Power Shift Project, the International Women's Media Foundation, Press Forward, the TIME'S UP Legal Defense Fund, and the Women's Media Center.
        One of the other recipients, RAINN, operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline.
        "This generous support will make it possible for us to help tens of thousands more survivors," the group's president Scott Berkowitz said.
        Moonves was not mentioned by name in the press release. It only said the "grant announcement is part of the Company's separation agreement with the Company's former chief executive officer."
        But the donations are a reminder that the company has yet to decide what to do about the rest of his severance. Under the terms of his enormously generous employment contract, Moonves was owed about $140 million. When he was ousted, $20 million was set aside for grants and the remaining $120 million was set up in a trust.
        The money is still in a holding pattern while the CBS board determines whether Moonves could be fired for cause, giving the company reason to claw back the $120 million. According to a draft report by two law firms that was obtained by The New York Times, lawyers working for the board have found multiple reasons for the board to consider Moonves fired for cause.
          Moonves has denied any nonconsensual sexual relations. His lawyer says he has fully cooperated with the law firm investigators.
          It is unclear if the lawyers' findings about Moonves and CBS will be made public. The grant recipients brought this up in the joint statement on Friday: "We look forward to receiving the full results of the investigation into Mr. Moonves and an update on additional concrete commitments that CBS - and all organizations - will make to support lasting change."

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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          621
          Who could replace Theresa May as leader?https://topnews.pw/who-could-replace-theresa-may-as-leader/ Sat, 15 Dec 2018 14:40:23 +0000 https://topnews.pw/?p=618

          Theresa May won a vote of confidence on Wednesday evening, which was called after the required 48 letters demanding a contest were submitted.

          But despite winning, her future looks far from certain.

          Here - based on the latest odds at the bookmakers - are the fancied runners tipped to be vying for the top job, if and when Mrs May's tenure as prime ministers comes to an end. None has so far declared their intention to stand.

          Boris Johnson

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Boris Johnson, 54, was the face of the campaign to get Britain out of the EU and did little to disguise his disappointment with Mrs May's Brexit plan, eventually resigning as foreign secretary over it.

          The former London mayor has long harboured leadership ambitions and is a big favourite with Conservative Party members but he would first have to get the backing of enough MPs to make into the ballot of members - no easy task.

          His first bid for the leadership, following the 2016 referendum, ended in disaster after fellow Leave supporter Michael Gove abandoned him at the 11th hour and put himself forward instead, prompting Mr Johnson to withdraw from the race.

          Dominic Raab

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Dominic Raab, 44, had already been a long-standing Eurosceptic when he became part of the Leave campaign in the 2016 referendum.

          The former Brexit secretary resigned in November over what he described as "fatal flaws" in the prime ministers draft Brexit agreement.

          The former lawyer has refused to rule out standing in a leadership contest and is said to be "relaxed" about a no-deal scenario, which will appeal to Brexiteer MPs.

          He warned on Thursday that if Mrs May continues as prime minister, there is a "greater risk of a Jeremy Corbyn government".

          He added: "We will have to back her as best we can but the problem is that both in relation to Brexit and the wider sustainability of the government, given the likelihood of any changes to the deal, given the likely scale of opposition, it looks very difficult to see how this prime minister can lead us forward."

          Sajid Javid

          Image copyright Getty Images

          A former protege of George Osborne, 49-year-old Sajid Javid became the first home secretary from an ethnic minority background in April, following Amber Rudd's resignation.

          Long thought of as a Eurosceptic, it was a surprise to many when Mr Javid came out for Remain during the 2016 referendum.

          An MP since 2010, he has previously served as business secretary and then culture secretary, and was part of a short-lived "joint ticket" leadership bid in 2016, hoping to become chancellor with Stephen Crabb as PM.

          After the vote, he tweeted: "Right, vote over. Time to come together, deliver Brexit and so much more."

          Michael Gove

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Michael Gove, 51, made a dramatic comeback in June 2017 when he returned to the cabinet as environment secretary, just a year after he was sacked in the 2016 reshuffle following Mrs May's leadership victory.

          The former justice and education secretary came third in the last leadership contest, after withdrawing his support from fellow Leave campaigner Boris Johnson and deciding to stand himself.

          Mr Gove has not ruled himself out to succeed Mrs May but played down speculation, saying it was "extremely unlikely" he would stand and tweeting on Wednesday that he was "backing the Prime Minister 100%".

          Jeremy Hunt

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, 52, had always been seen as a Eurosceptic but was one of the figures supporting the David Cameron Remain position during the 2016 referendum.

          Mr Hunt, who was the longest serving health secretary in the history of the NHS before being promoted to foreign secretary, is considered a close ally of Theresa May.

          However he has faced a number of controversies during his career, including a battle over a new contract for junior doctors in 2015.

          Mr Hunt tweeted his congratulations to Mrs May after the vote, saying her "stamina, resilience and decency has again won the day".

          David Davis

          Image copyright Getty Images

          The former Brexit secretary was the first minister to quit over Mrs May's Chequers plan in July, saying he couldn't back a policy he didn't believe in.

          An MP since 1987, Mr Davis, 69, first stood to be Conservative leader in 2001 and was an overwhelming favourite to replace Michael Howard in 2005 but lost out to David Cameron.

          He went on to serve as shadow home secretary under Mr Cameron but dramatically resigned his seat and frontbench role in protest at plans for identity cards and 42-day detention without charge.

          He successfully fought a by-election and returned to the backbenches before unexpectedly being propelled back into frontline politics as Brexit secretary after the 2016 referendum.

          Amber Rudd

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Amber Rudd only returned to the cabinet as work and pensions secretary in November after resigning as home secretary over the Windrush scandal.

          She was a leading Remain campaigner in the 2016 referendum and although being a vocal supporter of the PM's Brexit plan, she has also proposed an alternative, which would see the UK being more closely tied to the EU.

          The 55-year-old MP has a slim majority of 346 in her Hastings constituency and the risk of losing her seat could hinder her chances.

          On Thursday, she said the vote has put an end to the leadership question.

          She said Mrs May has "got the support of the party behind her" and that she hopes the government can now get on with delivering a successful exit from the EU.

          Others being talked about as possible contenders

          Brexiteer Esther McVey, who quit the government over Mrs May's deal has already shown her ability to bounce back after losing her seat in 2015.

          Penny Mordaunt was a leading figure in the Leave campaign in 2016 and despite appearing reluctant to explicitly back Theresa May's Brexit plan, she has not resigned from her cabinet role as international development secretary.

          Liz Truss, currently second-in-command at the Treasury, has been building up her profile with some memorable party conference appearances.

          Commons leader Andrea Leadsom, a Brexiteer who challenged Mrs May in 2016 before withdrawing, might fancy another go

          Attorney General Geoffrey Cox was a big hit at this year's Tory conference, with a theatrical speech, prompting talk of him as a future leader.

          Priti Patel, a Brexiteer who quit the government over private trips to Israel, has a strong base of support which is reflected in the betting.

          Jacob Rees-Mogg, who led calls for Mrs May to go, has previously denied having leadership ambitions. Might he change his mind?

          Theresa May's second-in-command David Lidington, a Remain supporter, also features in the betting.

          Backbencher Tom Tugendhat, Cabinet ministers Matthew Hancock and Gavin Williamson, backbencher James Cleverly and Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson are also on the bookmakers' lists as outsiders.

          Remain-supporting former education secretary Justine Greening has not ruled out standing if a vacancy arose.

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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          Theresa May won a vote of confidence on Wednesday evening, which was called after the required 48 letters demanding a contest were submitted.

          But despite winning, her future looks far from certain.

          Here - based on the latest odds at the bookmakers - are the fancied runners tipped to be vying for the top job, if and when Mrs May's tenure as prime ministers comes to an end. None has so far declared their intention to stand.

          Boris Johnson

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Boris Johnson, 54, was the face of the campaign to get Britain out of the EU and did little to disguise his disappointment with Mrs May's Brexit plan, eventually resigning as foreign secretary over it.

          The former London mayor has long harboured leadership ambitions and is a big favourite with Conservative Party members but he would first have to get the backing of enough MPs to make into the ballot of members - no easy task.

          His first bid for the leadership, following the 2016 referendum, ended in disaster after fellow Leave supporter Michael Gove abandoned him at the 11th hour and put himself forward instead, prompting Mr Johnson to withdraw from the race.

          Dominic Raab

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Dominic Raab, 44, had already been a long-standing Eurosceptic when he became part of the Leave campaign in the 2016 referendum.

          The former Brexit secretary resigned in November over what he described as "fatal flaws" in the prime ministers draft Brexit agreement.

          The former lawyer has refused to rule out standing in a leadership contest and is said to be "relaxed" about a no-deal scenario, which will appeal to Brexiteer MPs.

          He warned on Thursday that if Mrs May continues as prime minister, there is a "greater risk of a Jeremy Corbyn government".

          He added: "We will have to back her as best we can but the problem is that both in relation to Brexit and the wider sustainability of the government, given the likelihood of any changes to the deal, given the likely scale of opposition, it looks very difficult to see how this prime minister can lead us forward."

          Sajid Javid

          Image copyright Getty Images

          A former protege of George Osborne, 49-year-old Sajid Javid became the first home secretary from an ethnic minority background in April, following Amber Rudd's resignation.

          Long thought of as a Eurosceptic, it was a surprise to many when Mr Javid came out for Remain during the 2016 referendum.

          An MP since 2010, he has previously served as business secretary and then culture secretary, and was part of a short-lived "joint ticket" leadership bid in 2016, hoping to become chancellor with Stephen Crabb as PM.

          After the vote, he tweeted: "Right, vote over. Time to come together, deliver Brexit and so much more."

          Michael Gove

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Michael Gove, 51, made a dramatic comeback in June 2017 when he returned to the cabinet as environment secretary, just a year after he was sacked in the 2016 reshuffle following Mrs May's leadership victory.

          The former justice and education secretary came third in the last leadership contest, after withdrawing his support from fellow Leave campaigner Boris Johnson and deciding to stand himself.

          Mr Gove has not ruled himself out to succeed Mrs May but played down speculation, saying it was "extremely unlikely" he would stand and tweeting on Wednesday that he was "backing the Prime Minister 100%".

          Jeremy Hunt

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, 52, had always been seen as a Eurosceptic but was one of the figures supporting the David Cameron Remain position during the 2016 referendum.

          Mr Hunt, who was the longest serving health secretary in the history of the NHS before being promoted to foreign secretary, is considered a close ally of Theresa May.

          However he has faced a number of controversies during his career, including a battle over a new contract for junior doctors in 2015.

          Mr Hunt tweeted his congratulations to Mrs May after the vote, saying her "stamina, resilience and decency has again won the day".

          David Davis

          Image copyright Getty Images

          The former Brexit secretary was the first minister to quit over Mrs May's Chequers plan in July, saying he couldn't back a policy he didn't believe in.

          An MP since 1987, Mr Davis, 69, first stood to be Conservative leader in 2001 and was an overwhelming favourite to replace Michael Howard in 2005 but lost out to David Cameron.

          He went on to serve as shadow home secretary under Mr Cameron but dramatically resigned his seat and frontbench role in protest at plans for identity cards and 42-day detention without charge.

          He successfully fought a by-election and returned to the backbenches before unexpectedly being propelled back into frontline politics as Brexit secretary after the 2016 referendum.

          Amber Rudd

          Image copyright Getty Images

          Amber Rudd only returned to the cabinet as work and pensions secretary in November after resigning as home secretary over the Windrush scandal.

          She was a leading Remain campaigner in the 2016 referendum and although being a vocal supporter of the PM's Brexit plan, she has also proposed an alternative, which would see the UK being more closely tied to the EU.

          The 55-year-old MP has a slim majority of 346 in her Hastings constituency and the risk of losing her seat could hinder her chances.

          On Thursday, she said the vote has put an end to the leadership question.

          She said Mrs May has "got the support of the party behind her" and that she hopes the government can now get on with delivering a successful exit from the EU.

          Others being talked about as possible contenders

          Brexiteer Esther McVey, who quit the government over Mrs May's deal has already shown her ability to bounce back after losing her seat in 2015.

          Penny Mordaunt was a leading figure in the Leave campaign in 2016 and despite appearing reluctant to explicitly back Theresa May's Brexit plan, she has not resigned from her cabinet role as international development secretary.

          Liz Truss, currently second-in-command at the Treasury, has been building up her profile with some memorable party conference appearances.

          Commons leader Andrea Leadsom, a Brexiteer who challenged Mrs May in 2016 before withdrawing, might fancy another go

          Attorney General Geoffrey Cox was a big hit at this year's Tory conference, with a theatrical speech, prompting talk of him as a future leader.

          Priti Patel, a Brexiteer who quit the government over private trips to Israel, has a strong base of support which is reflected in the betting.

          Jacob Rees-Mogg, who led calls for Mrs May to go, has previously denied having leadership ambitions. Might he change his mind?

          Theresa May's second-in-command David Lidington, a Remain supporter, also features in the betting.

          Backbencher Tom Tugendhat, Cabinet ministers Matthew Hancock and Gavin Williamson, backbencher James Cleverly and Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson are also on the bookmakers' lists as outsiders.

          Remain-supporting former education secretary Justine Greening has not ruled out standing if a vacancy arose.

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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          Investigation Unearths Hundreds Of Sexual Abuse Allegations In Independent Baptist Churcheshttps://topnews.pw/investigation-unearths-hundreds-of-sexual-abuse-allegations-in-independent-baptist-churches/ Sat, 15 Dec 2018 10:07:18 +0000 https://topnews.pw/?p=615

          An investigation has uncovered hundreds of abuse allegations against leaders of a conservative, loosely affiliated network of evangelical Christian churches. 

          The report, published by the Fort Worth Star-Telegram on Sunday, identified 412 abuse allegations in 187 independent fundamental Baptist (IFB) churches and institutions across 40 states and Canada, with some cases reaching as far back as the 1970s. 

          The Star-Telegram spoke to more than 200 current or former IFB church members who shared stories about “rape, assault, humiliation and fear.” Many of the stories have already been made public through criminal cases, lawsuits and news reports. However, the newspaper said its reporters uncovered 21 new abuse allegations in the course of its eight-month investigation.

          In total, the newspaper said it found that 168 IFB church leaders were accused or have been convicted of sexually abusing children.

          Some of the women interviewed suggested that the patriarchal theology preached in IFB churches protects its male pastors from criticism and helps create a pattern of abuse and cover-up.

          Interviewees told the Star-Telegram that pastors in IFB churches were treated as if they were chosen by God and beyond reproach. Abusers used their power and position to psychologically manipulate and silence their victims, the women said. And often, even when victims spoke up, the accused pastors would manage to avoid criminal charges and use informal pastoral networks to relocate to another church. 

          ehrlif via Getty Images
          An investigation uncovers hundreds of cases of alleged abuse, including the sexual abuse of children, at independent fundamental Baptist churches across the U.S. and Canada.

          Stacey Shiflett, an independent fundamental Baptist pastor and abuse victim from Maryland, said it’s been the “M.O.” in fundamentalist churches for pastors to sweep abuse allegations under the rug. 

          “The one that does the abuse is the one that always comes out the other side smelling like a rose and goes down the road to another church, so he can do it again to somebody else,” Shiflett said in a YouTube video from May, which is cited in the report.

          About 2.5 percent of American adults identify as independent fundamental Baptists, according to the Pew Research Center ― a higher percentage than those who identify as Episcopalians, Presbyterians or members of the Assemblies of God.

          The most well-known independent fundamental Baptists are likely the Duggars, who starred on TLC’s reality show “19 Kids and Counting.” The show was canceled in 2015 after the network learned that eldest son Josh Duggar had been accused of sexually abusing girls, including four of his sisters, and that his parents had kept the abuse hidden.

          America’s estimated 6,000 IFB churches can be part of loosely tied fellowships or pastors’ networks. There are also shared children’s camps, conferences and church-affiliated colleges. However, IFB churches don’t have the hierarchical denominational structures that unite more mainstream evangelical groups, like the Southern Baptist Convention. 

          Ashley Easter, an abuse survivor and advocate who grew up in IFB churches, told HuffPost that she believes the independent nature of the churches has played a role in leaders’ ability to cover up abuse. 

          “This makes it easy for churches to pass off abusive pastors and missionaries to other churches in their network or to blacklist survivors,” Easter said. 

          At the same time, when scandals come to light, IFB churches can distance themselves from others in the denomination “so they themselves are not scrutinized,” Easter said.

          While practices can vary from church to church, independent fundamental Baptists do share some core beliefs, according to Christianity Today: that the Bible is the divinely inspired and inerrant word of God, for example, and that people should use only the King James Version of the text. Independent fundamental Baptists refrain from engaging in pop culture and many also home-school their kids. 

          FluxFactory via Getty Images
          Abuses in the independent Baptist churches are more easily kept quiet because of the lack of a formal structure to the denomination.

          Easter said that patriarchy is a “core tenant” of IFB theology that plays into its “culture of abuse.” Women in independent fundamental Baptist churches are expected to adhere to strict standards of modesty ― and clothing that deviates from this expectation is often pointed to as the reason for a man’s inappropriate behavior, Easter said. 

          “Women are always placed in positions of submission under men, making them more vulnerable to abuse,” she said. “Women’s voices are often dismissed when they come forward about abuse, while ‘God’s man’ is deemed untouchable.”

          In this solidly conservative setting, independent Baptists often look to their pastors as authority figures. Pastors in IFB churches are deeply involved in congregants’ lives ― helping people decide whom to date and whether to take a new job, for example.  

          Sarah Jackson, a 29-year-old from Maryland, wrote about the level of trust congregants placed in pastors in a Facebook post in May. 

          ″I was raised in a way where you respect your elders and your leaders. Your Pastor in the Baptist faith, is pretty much right under God. You trust him. With everything,” Jackson wrote. “You go to him for guidance, advice, and wisdom. He is someone you can [count] on when your parents aren’t around, right? Someone you ( as a child ) idolize for lack of a better word.”

          In that post, Jackson accused a prominent IFB pastor of sexually assaulting her during her senior year of high school, claiming the pastor used his church position to manipulate her.

          “I have kept quiet for 12 years because I am not a spiteful person,” Jackson wrote. “This kills me to type. I cared about him. But I also cared for my innocence which was ripped from me by someone I was supposed to trust.”

          After the allegation came out, the pastor in question was reportedly able to get a new job at a different church across the country.

          One of the pastors most frequently cited in the Star-Telegram’s investigation was Dave Hyles, son of the influential late pastor Jack Hyles, who in the 1970s and 1980s led one of the largest IFB churches in the country, in Hammond, Indiana. At least four women have accused Hyles of sexual abusing them when they were teenagers. He has never faced charges. The Star-Telegram claims that whenever Hyles got in trouble, he was able to relocate to a different church.

          The Star-Telegram claims that alumni of church-affiliated colleges use those informal networks to help abusers find new churches.

          HuffPost has reached out to Hyles, who now runs Fallen in Grace, a ministry that offers counseling to pastors and lay Christians dealing with moral failures. The ministry is part of Family Baptist Church in Columbia, Tennessee. 

          Lisa Meister, one of the women interviewed by the Star-Telegram, claimed that when she told church leaders in the 1980s that a youth pastor had sexually abused her, the church had both her and the alleged abuser appear in front of the congregation to repent their sins. Then the youth pastor was sent to another church. 

          “It made me very distrustful of men,” Meister said. “It made me very distrustful of the pastor.”

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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          An investigation has uncovered hundreds of abuse allegations against leaders of a conservative, loosely affiliated network of evangelical Christian churches. 

          The report, published by the Fort Worth Star-Telegram on Sunday, identified 412 abuse allegations in 187 independent fundamental Baptist (IFB) churches and institutions across 40 states and Canada, with some cases reaching as far back as the 1970s. 

          The Star-Telegram spoke to more than 200 current or former IFB church members who shared stories about “rape, assault, humiliation and fear.” Many of the stories have already been made public through criminal cases, lawsuits and news reports. However, the newspaper said its reporters uncovered 21 new abuse allegations in the course of its eight-month investigation.

          In total, the newspaper said it found that 168 IFB church leaders were accused or have been convicted of sexually abusing children.

          Some of the women interviewed suggested that the patriarchal theology preached in IFB churches protects its male pastors from criticism and helps create a pattern of abuse and cover-up.

          Interviewees told the Star-Telegram that pastors in IFB churches were treated as if they were chosen by God and beyond reproach. Abusers used their power and position to psychologically manipulate and silence their victims, the women said. And often, even when victims spoke up, the accused pastors would manage to avoid criminal charges and use informal pastoral networks to relocate to another church. 

          ehrlif via Getty Images
          An investigation uncovers hundreds of cases of alleged abuse, including the sexual abuse of children, at independent fundamental Baptist churches across the U.S. and Canada.

          Stacey Shiflett, an independent fundamental Baptist pastor and abuse victim from Maryland, said it’s been the “M.O.” in fundamentalist churches for pastors to sweep abuse allegations under the rug. 

          “The one that does the abuse is the one that always comes out the other side smelling like a rose and goes down the road to another church, so he can do it again to somebody else,” Shiflett said in a YouTube video from May, which is cited in the report.

          About 2.5 percent of American adults identify as independent fundamental Baptists, according to the Pew Research Center ― a higher percentage than those who identify as Episcopalians, Presbyterians or members of the Assemblies of God.

          The most well-known independent fundamental Baptists are likely the Duggars, who starred on TLC’s reality show “19 Kids and Counting.” The show was canceled in 2015 after the network learned that eldest son Josh Duggar had been accused of sexually abusing girls, including four of his sisters, and that his parents had kept the abuse hidden.

          America’s estimated 6,000 IFB churches can be part of loosely tied fellowships or pastors’ networks. There are also shared children’s camps, conferences and church-affiliated colleges. However, IFB churches don’t have the hierarchical denominational structures that unite more mainstream evangelical groups, like the Southern Baptist Convention. 

          Ashley Easter, an abuse survivor and advocate who grew up in IFB churches, told HuffPost that she believes the independent nature of the churches has played a role in leaders’ ability to cover up abuse. 

          “This makes it easy for churches to pass off abusive pastors and missionaries to other churches in their network or to blacklist survivors,” Easter said. 

          At the same time, when scandals come to light, IFB churches can distance themselves from others in the denomination “so they themselves are not scrutinized,” Easter said.

          While practices can vary from church to church, independent fundamental Baptists do share some core beliefs, according to Christianity Today: that the Bible is the divinely inspired and inerrant word of God, for example, and that people should use only the King James Version of the text. Independent fundamental Baptists refrain from engaging in pop culture and many also home-school their kids. 

          FluxFactory via Getty Images
          Abuses in the independent Baptist churches are more easily kept quiet because of the lack of a formal structure to the denomination.

          Easter said that patriarchy is a “core tenant” of IFB theology that plays into its “culture of abuse.” Women in independent fundamental Baptist churches are expected to adhere to strict standards of modesty ― and clothing that deviates from this expectation is often pointed to as the reason for a man’s inappropriate behavior, Easter said. 

          “Women are always placed in positions of submission under men, making them more vulnerable to abuse,” she said. “Women’s voices are often dismissed when they come forward about abuse, while ‘God’s man’ is deemed untouchable.”

          In this solidly conservative setting, independent Baptists often look to their pastors as authority figures. Pastors in IFB churches are deeply involved in congregants’ lives ― helping people decide whom to date and whether to take a new job, for example.  

          Sarah Jackson, a 29-year-old from Maryland, wrote about the level of trust congregants placed in pastors in a Facebook post in May. 

          ″I was raised in a way where you respect your elders and your leaders. Your Pastor in the Baptist faith, is pretty much right under God. You trust him. With everything,” Jackson wrote. “You go to him for guidance, advice, and wisdom. He is someone you can [count] on when your parents aren’t around, right? Someone you ( as a child ) idolize for lack of a better word.”

          In that post, Jackson accused a prominent IFB pastor of sexually assaulting her during her senior year of high school, claiming the pastor used his church position to manipulate her.

          “I have kept quiet for 12 years because I am not a spiteful person,” Jackson wrote. “This kills me to type. I cared about him. But I also cared for my innocence which was ripped from me by someone I was supposed to trust.”

          After the allegation came out, the pastor in question was reportedly able to get a new job at a different church across the country.

          One of the pastors most frequently cited in the Star-Telegram’s investigation was Dave Hyles, son of the influential late pastor Jack Hyles, who in the 1970s and 1980s led one of the largest IFB churches in the country, in Hammond, Indiana. At least four women have accused Hyles of sexual abusing them when they were teenagers. He has never faced charges. The Star-Telegram claims that whenever Hyles got in trouble, he was able to relocate to a different church.

          The Star-Telegram claims that alumni of church-affiliated colleges use those informal networks to help abusers find new churches.

          HuffPost has reached out to Hyles, who now runs Fallen in Grace, a ministry that offers counseling to pastors and lay Christians dealing with moral failures. The ministry is part of Family Baptist Church in Columbia, Tennessee. 

          Lisa Meister, one of the women interviewed by the Star-Telegram, claimed that when she told church leaders in the 1980s that a youth pastor had sexually abused her, the church had both her and the alleged abuser appear in front of the congregation to repent their sins. Then the youth pastor was sent to another church. 

          “It made me very distrustful of men,” Meister said. “It made me very distrustful of the pastor.”

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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          Artist Turns Vintage Portraits Into Heroes Of Pop Culturehttps://topnews.pw/artist-turns-vintage-portraits-into-heroes-of-pop-culture/ Sat, 15 Dec 2018 05:41:17 +0000 https://topnews.pw/?p=612

          Alex Gross is a full-time artist who is absolutely fascinated by old photos and vintage pictures, especially those with strong hints of Victorian Era - a time period in which the artist confesses he would like to have lived himself.

          There is just something intrinsically beautiful about Vintage, and Alex Gross has surely done full justice to these old photographs from the 1870s. Using oil and acrylic the artist has breathed a new life into them, transforming the people of yesterday into incredible vintage superheroes and characters of pop culture.

          Below, you will find a wide selection of the artist's works which we hope you will find enjoyable, so scroll down and see for yourself!

          #1

          #2

          #3

          #4

          #5

          #6

          #7

          #8

          #9

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          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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          Alex Gross is a full-time artist who is absolutely fascinated by old photos and vintage pictures, especially those with strong hints of Victorian Era - a time period in which the artist confesses he would like to have lived himself.

          There is just something intrinsically beautiful about Vintage, and Alex Gross has surely done full justice to these old photographs from the 1870s. Using oil and acrylic the artist has breathed a new life into them, transforming the people of yesterday into incredible vintage superheroes and characters of pop culture.

          Below, you will find a wide selection of the artist's works which we hope you will find enjoyable, so scroll down and see for yourself!

          #1

          #2

          #3

          #4

          #5

          #6

          #7

          #8

          #9

          #10

          Original Article : HERE ; This post was curated & posted using : RealSpecific

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          612